Clinical Depression vs. Situational Depression

Clinical depression is a serious health problem that warrants immediate professional intervention.

Depression is one of the world’s most frequently encountered maladies, and recent United Nations World Health Organization research indicates that the problem will continue to increase and will soon be the second most dangerous global medical problem, following only heart disease.

Not allbipolar banner depression is the same, however. A passing sense of sadness is normal for all of us. Depression exists when normal emotions are experienced without sufficient motivation, or if that sadness remain after it should have passed. Clinical depression is the most severe form of the problem. Others suffer from situational depression or chronic low-grade depression (dysthymia). All incidences of depression deserve careful attention, but those experiencing clinical depression should seek treatment immediately from a qualified physician.

Situational depression is fetched from some specific event in life, and normally it will dissipate within a few weeks. Although it may share many of the same features of clinical depression such as agitation, nervousness, changes in appetite or sleeping habits, it is not as severe or long-lasting.

One may be experiencing clinical depression when their “down mood” lasts for over two weeks. Those suffering from the illness are virtually unable to enjoy any part of their life. Suicidal ideation and a sense of complete hopelessness are common.

Clinical instances of depression do not necessarily require any specific trigger. However, events in a person’s life can precipitate the onset of the condition. This indicates that episodes of depression which can seemingly be easily linked to a specific happening, should not be automatically presumed to be situational in nature.

Whereas, situational depression may disappear as the sufferer finds ways to cope with the problem`s triggers. Clinically depressed individuals require professional assistance to deal with the condition. Frequently, antidepressant medications and/or therapeutic solutions are prescribed for the treatment of clinical depression. Those who fail to seek out help for their depression may experience an escalation in the severity of symptoms. This will certainly undermine one`s quality of life, and that can even be fatal.

All forms of depression adversely impact the quality of life for sufferers and should be taken seriously. However, clinical episodes of depression are of such tremendous potential severity that one must take action to stave off a worsening of the situation.

If you or someone you know is experiencing common symptoms associated with depression and has been in that rut for more than a few weeks, medical intervention should be immediately sought. The age-old stigma regarding mental illness in our society should not be an excuse to avoid seeking treatment. Not only are those biases beginning to disappear as the extent of the depression epidemic becomes more widely known, the stakes are simply too high to justify such behavior.

The condition can be successfully treated. Thousands of people recover from illness and go on to live happy, well-adjusted lives, after dealing with clinical depression.

This might be a helpful resource for someone: When Going Through Hell… Don’t Stop! A Survivor’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety and Clinical Depression

clinical depression

Description:

In this groundbreaking book, self-help author Douglas Bloch shares his struggle with and ultimate recovery from a life-threatening depressive illness. Although the managed care mental health system failed to provide him with adequate treatment, Mr. Bloch devised a daily survival plan for living in hell which he adopted until the power of spirit, acting through a group of committed, loving people, brought about his recovery.

In addition to his compelling story, Mr. Bloch outlines a fourteen point brain maintenance program holistic approach to the treatment of anxiety and depression that includes: diet; nutrition; exercise; stress-reduction; medication; vitamin, mineral and herbal supplements; and the importance of creating strong bonds of social support (social isolation is both a cause and consequence of depression).

The book also includes a comprehensive 130 page self-help section on treating depression, including a 10 page listing of Internet sites for on-line healing assistance.

Moreover, the narrative is complemented by paintings from history’s great artists that visually depict the various states of mind that the author experienced. In receiving words and images that stimulate both sides of the brain, the reader is given a complete picture of the journey from depression to recovery.


15 thoughts on “Clinical Depression vs. Situational Depression

  1. […] I have given advice to those who have depression (major depressive disorder, clinical depression, situational depression – or even bipolar depression).  What I tell those people is in addition to taking their meds, […]

  2. […] herbal solutions can be an acceptable substitute to using traditional medication. Going to a health store can […]

  3. […] may feel uncomfortable with the “face” the situation and still be able to get some therapeutic value of bipolar disorder […]

  4. […] unstable if unable to resolve the feelings caused by pain.  Grief has been known to result in clinical depression, lasting for a long period which can lead to extreme difficulties and even death in the case of […]

  5. […] Drugs like heroin, alcohol, and tobacco are psychologically addictive – but they are also physiologically addictive.  In addition to the brain “wanting” them, the body “needs” them to function normally.  If you suddenly take away the heroin, a severe withdrawal syndrome will begin.  If you suddenly take away alcohol – you may have seizures and a number of life-threatening conditions. […]

  6. […] for identifying bipolar disorder symptoms and how to get the diagnosis confirmed Strategies for dealing with rants, attacks, blame, depression, mania and other behaviors. The book includes crucial information on […]

  7. […] However, there are a few solid indicators we can reference in order to determine if our sense of sadness is a normal part of our healthy emotional range or an incident of depression warranting medical […]

  8. […] him medication and recommends extended therapy.  The psychiatrist gives her a prescription for situational anxiety disorder – as she is having intermittent panic attacks due to his behavior.  He recommends that my friend […]

  9. […] then… bipolar depression is like the times when the Ferrari is in the shop. It’s up on the lift, and you’re going […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Clinical depression is the harshest of depressions. Others have situational depression or persistent low-grade […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Major depressive disorder is the most dreadful of depressions. Others suffer with situational depression or persistent […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Unipolar depression is the harshest of depressions. Others have situational depression or lingering low-grade […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Clinical depression is the most dreadful of depressions. Others have situational depression or persistent low-grade […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Clinical depression is the most dreadful of depressions. Others suffer with situational depression or lingering […]

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    […] experienced without sufficient motivation, or the feelings remain after they should have passed. Major depressive disorder is the most severe of depressions. Others suffer from situational depression or persistent […]

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