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Medication

Medication in use for mentally ill people. Medication in use for treatment of depression, anxiety, bipolarity etc.

Psychologically and Physiologically Addictive Medications

Are antidepressants psychologically or physiologically addictive? – Kind of – but not in the way that you think!

For many years, most of the medical community have held steadfast to the idea that antidepressants were not “addictive.” But many Prescription Pain Medicationof those, not in the medical community or those with no personal experience of drug abuse or psychiatric illness, were convinced that those happypills were subject to abuse.  In fact, both were wrong.  Antidepressants are not “abusable“, but they are sort of “addiciting“.

To be clear – antidepressants are not subject to abuse.  They do not produce a “high” or anything like intoxication.  There is no immediate reward for taking antidepressants; in fact, one of the most troublesome things about antidepressants is that they take several weeks to actually work.

However, there is a difference between “abusabledrugs and “addictivedrugs.  Addiction is generally thought of as a psychological illness – in the way that marijuana and cocaine are psychologically addictive.  There is little evidence that either drug is physiologically addictive.  The body does not become dependent on the drug… the brain may – but not the body.

On the other hand, some medications are physiologically addictive – without being psychologically addictiveHormones are an example of this.  Once you start taking hormones (such as estrogen replacement), your body will adjust to the presence of the Psychologically Drug Addicted Dreammedication – and if suddenly discontinued, will not function normally.  There are many other examples of this, but you get the point.

Drugs like heroin, alcohol, and tobacco are psychologically addictive – but they are also physiologically addictive.  In addition to the brain “wanting” them, the body “needs” them to function normally.  If you suddenly take away the heroin, a severe withdrawal syndrome will begin.  If you suddenly take away alcohol – you may have seizures and a number of life-threatening conditions.

Prescription pain medications and anti-anxiety agents, when taken inappropriately can also be both psychologically and physiologically addictive – like heroin and alcohol.  When taken as prescribed, they are often still physiologically addictive.

Back to the antidepressants.

Certainly, years ago, sudden withdrawal of prescription antidepressants was known to be dangerous. But, with the development of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac, Paxil, and many others, most people have believed that there was no chance of physical addiction, and there would be no withdrawal.

Over the years, I would hear about people who complained of “withdrawal” symptoms which I dismissed – like most people in the medical community.  Many of these patients also had a myriad of complaints – generalized pain, foggy thinking, and other things that were considered to be indicative of a hypochondriac or chronic complainer.  Turns out maybe I was wrong.

SSRIs and other “next generation” antidepressants CAN cause withdrawal symptoms.  Some (not all but some) patients may experience symptoms of withdrawal such as Anxiety.

  • Anxiety
  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Depression and mood swings
  • Light-headedness and dizziness
  • Fatigue, headache and flu-like symptoms
  • Electric shock sensations
  • Loss of coordination, tremors and muscle spasms
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping

Most people don’t experience these – or have only a mild reaction.  Unfortunately, even “tapering” down won’t make that much difference as the symptoms may take a long time to go away – but the withdrawal is real and shouldn’t be dismissed!

Melissa Lind

Mental Disorders Failure to Take Medications Consistently

Don’t skip your meds – even if you are sick!

It is cold and flu season in the Northern part of the world, and though that isn’t the only time people get sick, it brings up an issue common in Bipolar disorder and other mental disorders.

Medication - Mental DisordersOne of the biggest problems in maintaining a level mood state or semblance of “normalcy” in people with mental disorders is the failure to take medications consistently.  In a lot of instances, mentally ill persons will stop taking the medication on purpose because they are “better” and “don’t need it”.

As mentioned many times before – this is, usually, done in secret. Without consultation with professionals, friends or family members who do not find out until someone with a mental disorder has gone “off-track” and had an “episode”.

But, another cause of medication non-adherence is forgetfulness. Forgetfulness wouldn’t seem to be a big deal as many medications are “forgotten” one day and resumed the next – blood pressure medicine, birth control pills, and antibiotics etc. All with each of their own ramifications.  In the case of the forgotten anti-depressant, anti-manic agent, anti-psychotic, a different set of events comes into play.

Mentally ill people may “forget” the first day but by the second day, the thoughts of “I am OK” start to intrude.  This may lead back to the first case of non-adherence where the patient then decides to quit purposefully taking their medication – obviously without telling anyone.

Mental MindWith your illness, you may not feel like getting up.  You may not feel like eating.  You may not feel like taking your medicine – but you should.  You must.  Even when your mental illness seems secondary to a physical illness, the medicine that keeps you functioning on a semi-even level is vital.  Allowing yourself to skip, even one day can ultimately cause a “relapse”.

If you skip today because you don’t feel good, you may skip tomorrow.  If you skip today and tomorrow, because you didn’t feel good, you will probably hear the voice that always says, “I am doing OK,” because you are OK – for today.  A week or two, maybe a month or two – you won’t be OK.  You haven’t been in the past and likely you won’t in the future.

No matter why you skip your meds – don’t.

There are legitimate medical reasons not to quit without supervision – such as drug withdrawal and increases in seizure potential which are real, unpleasant, and possibly dangerous. But the biggest reason is the same as it has always been.  Eventually, it will lead you back down the path, and you won’t know until you are already out of balance.

One of the biggest challenges for a bipolar or schizophrenic (or many other) patient is to ignore the impulse to give in to “See, I’m OK and I don’t need this”.  In your rational mind, you know that you do.  You may resent it, but you know.

You may have to remind yourself of how far you have come – and remind yourself that this wasn’t the first time that you had to dig yourself out of a mess.

Remember how it was, how awful it was, and how hard it will be the next time to recover.

Melissa Lind

The medicine that keeps you functioning is vital – even if mental disorders seems secondary to physical illness!

Zoloft for a Treatment of Depression

Is it safe to use Zoloft for a treatment of depression?

Zoloft is a common antidepressant that doctors prescribe for the treatment of depression and depression symptoms. Zoloft is a very gentle antidepressant but has a powerful effect as well.

Depression and ZoloftZoloft can start working in as little as a week, although it could take up to three weeks to feel the symptoms of depression easing. Zoloft is safe to take for an extended period; however, one should never stop taking Zoloft “cold turkey.”

It isn’t addictive, in the truest sense of the word, but Zoloft is an SSRI, which means that it is forcing a change in the brain chemistry. Because of this, your doctor will most likely “wean” your body off of Zoloft slowly by reducing the dosages, and allowing your brain to do more of the work without help from the medication.

Zoloft is not just prescribed for the treatment of depression. Research has also found that it is a suitable medication for the treatment of panic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

There are side effects associated with the use of Zoloft. These include impotence and/or changes in sex drive and libido, upset stomach, drowsiness, anxiety, irritability, urination problems, appetite changes, headaches, constipation or diarrhea, blurred vision, nightmares, insomnia, hair loss, dry mouth, sweating, muscle spasms, slowed speech, irregular heartbeat, and tremors.

Symtoms of DepressionBefore taking Zoloft, your doctor needs to know if you have a history of mania, suicidal thoughts, high blood pressure, kidney disease, liver disease, heart disease, seizures, enlarged prostate, urination problems, thyroid problems, or glaucoma.

Despite the potential side effects, most people don’t have any trouble with Zoloft, and it is one of the most-prescribed drugs for the treatment of depression. It is also considered one of the safest drugs for depression treatment. If you suffer from depression, you should definitely discuss Zoloft with your physician.

Zoloft for depression treatment despite potential side effects

Treatment of Anxiety – Xanax

Xanax in use for treatment of anxiety arise questions

Many physicians prescribe Xanax to their patients for the treatment of anxiety, as well as for anxiety disorders. Xanax has a generic form called alprazolam, and has been used since it was approved by the FDA in 1981. Today, Xanax XR is also available.

Xanax - Treatment of AnxietyUnlike regular Xanax, Xanax XR is taken just once a day.

As with most medications, there are potential side effects when taking Xanax. It can cause your motor functions to become impaired while the drug is in your system. You may feel clumsy, become dizzy, or experience headaches and fatigue.

Serious side effects include blurred vision, slurred speech, confusion, personality changes, nightmares, memory loss, incontinence, constipation, nausea, and disorientation. It is rare, but possible, that Xanax could actually increase one’s anxiety.

Those who have a very rare and serious reaction to the medication may also experience nervousness, agitation, insomnia, muscle spasms, and even feelings of rage. If any of these things occurs, it is usually an indication that the dosage prescribed or taken was too high, and the solution is to reduce the dosage.

Xanax for Treatment of Anxiety DisorderXanax can become addictive with long-term use. At the same time, there are those patients who discover that the Xanax no longer works in controlling their anxiety or anxiety symptoms.

Xanax is a controlled drug and must be prescribed by a licensed physician. It is typically not prescribed for those who are under the age of 18. The drug cannot be taken while pregnant or nursing.

Xanax is a good drug for short-term treatment of anxiety, but if an addiction occurs, the withdrawal symptoms when the drug is discontinued from the treatment plan can be fairly severe. Withdrawal can result in shaking, rapid heartbeat, insomnia, seizure, sleep pattern changes, and of course, anxiety.

If you suffer from anxiety, you should discuss Xanax with your doctor. Only you and your health care professional can determine whether or not Xanax is the right course of treatment for you.

With so many side-effects lying “on the table”, the questions arise; is it really worth it – to use Xanax for the treatment of anxiety, and what`s one`s alternative anxiety treatment?

  • Statement on a You Tube video;  Xanax – More Addictive Than Heroin

Mental Illness in Children

Mental Illness In Children – Are We Too Afraid To Find Out?

Up until about 20 years ago, the idea of mental illness occurring in children was pretty much unthinkable.

Boys who were extremely active were sent outside to play.  Defiant children were punished or sent outside to play.  Irritable children were sent outside to play.  Depressed children were sent outside to play.  Get the picture?Get the Idea

Today we do know a lot more about mental illness and have a lot more medication to treat it.  As mental illness becomes more easily diagnosed in adults, it is natural that we begin to look at our children and wonder.  It is also natural that we look back on our own childhoods and wonder or even know that we were ill then too.

Even though most psychiatric diseases are not diagnosed until the teens or early adulthood, it should be fairly obvious that those diseases did not suddenly happen when the kid turned 18. Likely there were signs of existing mental disorder long before the diagnosis.  Unfortunately, some parents may be too afraid to look.

The problem with recognizing mental illness in childhood is that symptoms of mental illness are different from the symptoms in adults.  Children’s symptoms can be masked with other signs or even opposite to those in adults, so they are not obvious. In addition, the symptoms of many different psychiatric disorders are so similar that it is difficult to distinguish one disorder from another.  Some examples:

Depression in children can show as: Depression, Insomnia, Nightmares, Bedwetting, Anxiety, Combativeness, Lack of interest, Anger, Poor grades

Anxiety in children can show as: Insomnia, Nightmares, Bedwetting, Fearfulness, Depression, Poor grades, Social inadequacies, Lack of interest, Combativeness, Anger.

Mental Illness in ChildrenADHD can show as: Inattentiveness, Lack of interest, Fidgetiness, Poor grades, Irritability, Inability to make friends, Excessive anger, Lack of organization

Asperger’s can show as: Lack of interest, Poor grades, Inability to make friends, Excessive anger, Lack of organization

On the other hand normal childhood occurrences such as puberty can show as: Lack of attention, Difficulty getting along with friends, Unexpected anger, Excessive sleep, Inability to sleep, Nightmares, Irritability, Mood swings, Excessive anger, Excessive crying, Poor grades

And Sexual abuse can show as: Nightmares, Bed-wetting, Excessive anger, Anxiety, Depression, Mood swings, Irritability, Disinterest

So how can we determine if it is something that happened to the child, something that is temporary or something like a mental illness?

The best things we can do are to pay attention, know your children.  If they change, find out why.  Know your family history.  If they seem “different”, talk to their teachers.  If they are continuously exhibiting behavior outside of the range of “normal”, there may be something wrong.  Listen to your kids, if they tell you that something is wrong, it probably is.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Educate yourself.  Take the self-test quizzes.  Have your spouse or the child’s other caregivers take the tests.  Take all of this information to your healthcare provider and if that doesn’t work, find someone who will listen.

Most mental disorders are not diagnosed until the late teens or early adulthood – bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorder and schizophrenia.  There is more recognition today, but a lot of resistances to – both from parents and health professionals.  Don’t be afraid to seek help just because you are afraid of medication, knowing what is wrong and knowing your options can head off problems.

Recognizing an oncoming issue may help prevent years of anguish for your child and yourself.

Melissa Lind

Treatment of Depression Medication – Paxil

Medication in use for treatment of depression – Paxil

Paxil is one of the most highly prescribed medications for the treatment of depression. It has proven over time to be extremely safe and effective. Over the years, the makers of Paxil have created Paxil CR, or Paxil Controlled Release, which is the preferred Paxil choice of many doctors.

Paxil helps to treat depression that is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, as well as all other depression. Paxil works with neurotransmitters in the brain to adjust the level of serotonin that is being produced.

As with many medications, there are potential side effects. These include dry mouth, diarrhea, sweating, tremors, appetite changes, constipation, nausea, decreased or increased sex drive, insomnia, abnormal vision, drowsiness, and weakness. Paxil is only prescribed for adults aged 18 or older as research has found that many serotonin-producing drugs increase the presence of suicidal tendencies in young people.

Paxil is not addictive; however, your body may react to the discontinuance of the drug, and you may suffer from withdrawal symptoms that include abnormal dreams, agitation, nausea, headache, fatigue, and changes in sleep patterns.

Treatment of DepressionMost doctors will monitor your progress after being taken off Paxil, and may opt to wean the patient off of the medication instead. In most cases, Paxil will not be prescribed if you are pregnant or nursing.

Again, most people really don’t have any trouble with Paxil, and find that it is very effective for the treatment of depression, and all of the symptoms that go along with depression. Paxil is covered by most prescription drug insurance plans and is affordable even without insurance coverage.

If you or a loved one suffers from depression, Paxil is a treatment that should be considered. Discuss this issue with a doctor.

Based on your health history, your doctor may decide that Paxil is not for you. Be sure to give your doctor a complete medical history before being prescribed Paxil.

There will probably always be side effects from medications, also medications in use for treatment of depression; as you can find out by watching the documentary video on the page; “Mental Health Videos“. They claim that they can provide facts about psychotropic medications and the huge profits they create for the pharmaceutical industry.

Later we will have a look at another drug used in treatment of depression!