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Mental Health

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder, but can also describe persons struggle with health problems.

Mental Health Professionals and Suicide

Suicide – Threat of Liability for Mental Health Professionals

Suicide is the third most common cause of death for young adults – and the ninth highest for the general adult population.  This means that a large percentage of mental health professionals will have a patient that commits suicide. It may be as high as 80 percent of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and other therapists, that eventually have a patient who commits suicide.

Serious Mental Health ProfessionalYou might think that professionals are insulated against emotions that come with the death of a friend or acquaintance – but they aren’t.  Many health professionals report that even when death is expected (natural causes), they spend a great deal of time going over their treatment of the patient. They try to find out if they could have done anything different, (given another treatment) in order to help.

But, what may be surprising is the number of liability lawsuits filed against mental health professionals, when a patient commits suicide.  In fact, it is the number-one cause of responsibility lawsuits brought against mental health providers.
The threat of lawsuits, and also the stigma against people working it in the mental-health profession, has led to many psychiatrists refusals to treat the chronically suicidal. The profession sees it as a failure of the doctorMental health professionals are also less likely to see additional suicidal patients after they have had a patient succeed at suicide.

When a therapist or physician is unable, or unwilling, to treat a suicidal patient – it leaves the patient in the lurch.  It produces feelings of failure and hopelessness, without a doubt, compounding the fact that they are suicidal.  It may also be difficult for an extremely suicidal patient to find a new therapist or doctor.  Many patients report that the mental health professionals suddenly “don’t have time”.

We don’t think much about the way suicide will affect those around us – and certainly the professionals are way down the list of people whose feelings are important.

Mental health professionals also report that there is a lack of training on how to deal with suicidal patients, and processing the death of a patient.  More than half of professionals surveyed also Knocking on Heavens Doorstated that they really don’t believe they can prevent a patient from committing suicide.

Oddly, the complaint process against physicians has been shown to increase the risk of the physician becoming depressed. One of the consequences of this will be a worsening of the situation for mentally ill people. (Chronically suicidal patients)

This is a complicated process with no easy answers, but you should know that it is likely that all psychiatrists, therapists, social workers and other counselors probably need to be in counseling themselves.  When you find a new doctor or therapist – you might want to ask.

Even if you aren’t suicidal, you need to know that your counselor is as mentally healthy as possible, certainly healthier than you.

Melissa Lind

Mental Health Professionals Report a Lack of Training on How to Deal With Suicidal Patients

Holistic Treatment for Anxiety

Alternative medicine based on evidence?

The scientific community has criticized alternative medicine as being based on misleading statements, quackery, pseudoscience, ant science, fraud, or poor scientific methodology.Critics have said; “there is really no such thing as alternative medicine, just medicine that works and medicine that doesn’t”.

Or “Can there be any reasonable alternative to medicine based on evidence?” (Retrieved from Wikipedia)

Well, in my humble opinion, as long as there are alternative medicine out there, and it has helped a lot of people – among others a holistic non-chemical treatment for anxiety, why not try?

Melissa OilIf you aren’t keen on the idea of taking prescription drugs that may be addictive for your anxiety, there are other options. Holistic treatment may be what you prefer. Comprehensive treatment is essentially a natural non-chemical treatment for the condition.

Holistic treatment for anxiety starts with eating well. Make sure that you are getting plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods in your diet. Getting enough exercise, and fresh air is also a vital part of holistic anxiety treatment. You need to get outside in the fresh air and walk or do other physical activities that you enjoy at least five times a week, for approximately 30 minutes.

Together, eating right and exercising will help your brain naturally to produce the chemicals that create feelings of calmness and happiness. This alone will take you far in your treatment for anxiety, but you should note that it may take a couple of weeks or so to start feeling the real effects from eating right and exercising.
There are also many useful herbs that will help to put the brain chemistry back in order.

One such herb is lemon balm. Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis) is effective in the reduction of stress and helps you to relax. Lavender should also be used. Lavender is used to calm and to support the nervous system, and it will also help you to relax and sleep.Passionflower

Passion flower is another naturally calming herb. This herb literally “takes the edge off,” helps relieve stress and settles a nervous stomach, which is common for someone who suffers from anxiety.

If you are worried that a holistic treatment may not be as effective as chemical treatment, you have no cause to fear. Research has shown that in most cases, holistic treatment for anxiety is just as effective as chemical treatment for anxiety. In some instances, it is even more so.

Use of holistic treatment for anxiety does not mean that you shouldn’t seek the help of a trained therapist

Issues Related to Mental Health

Financial Impact of Depression and Grief

My name is Ella Moss, and I am writing because I recently finished a resource you might be interested in.
It is a financial guide looking at the costs of depression and grief.

There is a lot out there about the emotional costs of both, but though it would be interesting to look at another angel.

According to the London School of Economics, depression costs the economy £77 billion a year.

In the United States, the New York Times puts that cost at half a trillion dollars, but it is about individuals and their own finances too. Those with emotional disorders earn $16,000 less a year on average and can face severe financial difficulties.

Grief and DepresionWhen we consider issues that relate to mental health, we often (and rightly too) focus on the immediate emotional and physical aspects of the illness – for instance, how people can find their day to day health affected and how they cope with whatever mental condition they have.

Whilst it’s right to do so, sometimes the more practical considerations of such difficulties are forgotten.

Suffering from depression, anxiety or any form of condition that has an impact on your mental well-being can often mean that full time work is difficult.

Not only that, but you yourself may be in a position in which you’re caring for someone who suffers and need help and advice on where to turn.

If you’d like some helpful and sound ideas to help you, you can read this informative mental health guide:

About the Financial Impact of Depression and Grief.

Ella Moss

Bipolar Disorder and Risky Behavior

One of the most attractive facets of the “symptoms” of Bipolar Disorder is “risky behavior”

Even though this symptom irritates me, it is true. Actually, most of the medically described symptoms of the disorder irritate me.

Probably the reason this symptom bothers me is that like many others, I forget or wish to deny my own risky behavior.  I personally have wanted to think that I am, above all, that – and that my activities were justified which my therapist would say is oppositional behavior and really another symptom of Bipolar Disorder.

Not wishing to go into the specifics of risks that I have taken, I will say that upon honest examination, they have been many.  Because of Bipolar Disorder, I feel compelled justify them.  As a Bipolar, I could go on and write in circles about why I did what I did but really coming back to the same conclusion.  Technically, they have been justified, because I was ill.

Dangerious BehaviorExamples of risky behavior include things such as promiscuity, drug or alcohol abuse, shoplifting, gambling, excessive spending, infidelity, putting yourself in physical danger and others.  The obvious examples of this are celebrities who get into legal trouble because of risks they have taken – such as shoplifting, public exposure, public drunkenness, and drunk driving.  There is no logical reason for a celebrity to steal or shoplift as the things they steal “necessities” and that they can clearly afford to purchase.  There is also no reason for a celebrity to drive repeatedly drunk as they can usually afford a driver, and there is hardly ever a reason for public exposure.

Do I feel guilty for any of the risks I have taken?  Really, I don’t.  Were they against my moral values?  Really, they weren’t.  I certainly have regrets but no guilt.  I regret doing those things because of the trouble I caused and sometimes because they were things that others could judge me for.  Still today, even though I am well stabilized on medication, I am not sure they were against my morals.  Intellectually, I know that some of them were considered “wrong” or possibly illegal but that is the judgment of others, and my judgment system is different.

Guilt is defined as knowing that you did something wrong.  Shame is a judgment that others impose upon you to try and make you feel guilty.

Recently I read that bipolar patients wish to avoid feeling, choosing instead to think.  I agree with that (and I feel compelled to justify my agreement) by also adding that I also think that this is because people with Bipolar Disorder also feel too much.

Fortunately, today I am stabilized on medication and usually don’t exhibit risky behavior.  I haven’t had an episode in a few years – since the last time I quit taking my medication.

Melissa Lind

Knowledge Conquer the Shame of Mental Disorder

People Do Not Understand Mental Illness

Article as text, and with Video for blind and partially sighted people (Text-to-Speech Video article)


Suicide is not a weak or cowardly person that takes the lightweight solution. Suicide is a result of a disease called depression. With increased knowledge, understanding, with an increased understanding the shame disappears.

Bipolarity - Catherine Zeta-JonesCatherine Zeta-Jones has got a place in our hearts. Now that she has stood out as a bipolar, we love her only more. She is not only a great artist, but a woman with courage, rant, empathy and honesty. She is a role model for all girls who grow up in the day, and a daughter-in-law all mothers want.

But what about the ordinary man or lady in the street that does not have any film career behind him or her, that is not a familiar face among the population?

To expect a person that we have never heard of, or meant something about, should open and stand naked in front of a whole country and tell about his (or her) inner hell, is a lot to claim. But it is needed to break down the taboo by having it painful.

The constant negativity is not something a depressed person has decided to have, but the result of the disorder depression.

And when it`s downward spiral no end will take, suicide thoughts come.
Suicide is not a selfish act!

Not Like in the Movies

People with cancer can also have good times, even though the physical pain is present. I think some program for people with a
mental disorder would have the same effect. It would scare away all horror stories about the psychiatric department is a “mad house” and that people with furthering psychosis are crazy.

It is no secret that people who have never experienced or seen mentally ill people at close range only refer to what they have seen the movie or even imagined. All based on the little knowledge they have about what a mental disorder is.

And just this little knowledge people who do not have experienced mental illness is sitting inside with, is crucial to do something about. With increased knowledge comes understanding. And with understanding it will be easier to deal with the shame for the mentally ill, and openness will appear.

A Taboos’ Disease

The question is how to reach out with this knowledge.

A solution could be to have designated subjects in high school that was mandatory for all Mental Disorder Taboostudents where they taught young people about what a mental disorder is. Inform about why it occurs, how to help people who suffer and how one can help themselves and seek help if they should be hit by a mental disorder.

A depression is not a bad day. A depression is not whining over a couple of weeks.
Depression is a disease in the head. A disease in the same line as cancer and other diseases that are not equally taboo’s.
If one is in a state of depression, one loses oneself? It can feel as if life is completely meaningless. One can’t get out of bed. Curtains are pulled down. Darkness – a depressive person wants the darkness.

SSRIs – Not a Pill of “Happiness”

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

The balance in the brain is gone, and it is here the anti-depressive pills come into the picture – a means to restore balance in the brain. But it is not a “pill of happiness“.

Pills don`t make you happy automatically. Antidepressant does only half the job. The psychologist can do something, your friends and family also, but the rest is up to the depressed him or herself.

The depressed must have determination of another world and a false belief that everything is going to be OK. For the depressed it never feels like anything it’s ever going to be OK again. The depressed will get a different view of the world than before, and the pain feels like unbearable.

We Must Try to Understand Mental Disorder!

Lots of People don`t Know they are Bipolar

It seems to be a lot of people that don`t know what bipolar disorder is

There are people that I know that probably are bipolar, but they just don`t know it.
They have never been to counseling at a mental health professional to get diagnosed, because no one has told them that their problems, in fact, can be a mental illness.

Mental Mind SpiralOften-lot, grown-up people (age from 30 years and up) are not informed about what bipolar disorder is all about. They don`t know what it means, what it includes, how to get help and where to get help. Often-lot, not always.
The whole thing started probably when they were young, when bipolar disorder and all other mental illnesses were hush-hush and taboos’.

Of course, taboos and lack of information are not only a concern for those who might be bipolar, but for all kinds of mental illnesses that I know about.

If one suspects that a family member, a close friend or a coworker, has a mental illness, it is not easy to tell the person about what one believe/suspect.

Some people might suspect (themselves) that they have a mental illness, but are too proud to admit it, and for that reason not seek help from a counselor. They will probably never take any advice from others either regarding such sensitive personal things, having all taboos’ fresh in mind.

So, how do we approach these people – what are we supposed to do to let them know about our thoughts? Letting them know that there might be a “solution” to their problems. That it is somehow treatable – using medications. Tell them that it`s not their fault – they have an illness. They may at least feel better just by knowing.

Since IBipolar Mental Illnness suspect that a friend of mine is bipolar, should I contact a mental health professional just to ask for advice about how to approach my friend? I must admit; the thought has crossed my mind in several occasions related to some friends of mine, and especially in the case of member of my family.

I didn`t expect it to happen, but not long ago I got an opportunity to ask this special person in my life (my family member) how he felt about me asking a psychologist questions.

Just to get sorted things out. His answer was: don`t!
He didn`t want me to ask because he meant he had everything under control, and wanted to “mind his own business”. It wasn`t said in a rude way, he wasn`t angry with me, so, since he is an adult, I had to let it go.

Was that the right decision to make? I don`t have an answer to that question right now, so if anyone out there have an input to come with, please do – right here on this site, or on our Facebook page.

Lots of people that don`t know what bipolar disorder is