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Mental Health

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder, but can also describe persons struggle with health problems.

Anxiety Support Organizations

Need of anxiety support – There is help to get!

Viking Suffer From Anxiety DisorderIf you suffer from anxiety, you should know that you are not alone. You should also know that there is support available. Obviously, you need to discuss your anxiety with your health care professional and be treated for it, but whether you realize it or not, there are other mental health support sources out there as well.

The Anxiety Disorders Association of America is one such support organization. It was founded in 1980. The purpose of the ADAA is to offer support to patients, health care professionals, and anyone else who is affected by an anxiety disorder. The ADAA has a directory of self-help groups that you will find in your local area.

The Council on Anxiety Disorders is another good organization. It was founded in 1988, and regular meetings are held in Georgia. Here, you will also be able to obtain a listing of local support groups, and you will also receive materials that will aid in helping you to deal with your anxiety, or that of a loved one.

The National Anxiety Foundation is another excellent resource. Through this organization, you will be able to find doctors who treat anxiety, support groups, and anxiety-related information.

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) will also be able to help. This organization covers all mental health issues, including anxiety. They will be able to direct you to professional help, group help, provide information, and point you to other needed resources.

Because we live in an information society, where the average person can lay their hands on just about any type of information that they want, patients must start taking a more active role in their own health care and treatment. These organizations will essentially help you to help yourself.

Again, you do need the help of a doctor, but you can also find additional help through the many mental health support organizations that exist as well.

Anxiety Support Organizations can help you get self-help!

Afraid and Anxious to Loose

Afraid and Anxious

The video below illustrates that negative things in life may change, be modified from bad to better – even if you feel scared, worried and sometimes depressed.

This is a dog agility video, but with the words used in the text, one can easily relate it to human thoughts and feelings.
The text is about a dog’s thoughts on his owner.
Dogs can be afraid of their owners, afraid of not being good enough in their owners’ eyes, and fear of punishment. Or, they might be afraid of other people and other things. The anxiety spreads!

Similar things happen in the human world. One may be nervous and scared, with subsequent depression, and that one can gradually overcome the fear and depressions subside.

Anxious - No MoreOne can have a better life if one does not give up, but believe that things can change for the better!

I consider that a video like this is suitable for our website, which is about mental health! This is a video to reflect upon. It tells us that negativity can be changed to positivity. The human mind and how the animal brain functions are not THAT different.
We do need reminders that fear and anxiety don`t necessarily need to end up with long-term depression.

Watch this video and let your heart be touched – like mine was!
(In addition, the video gives us insight into the great sports dog agility – a sport for both dogs and humans give pleasure – pleasure for the operator of the sport and those watching)

Now I have this never losing, never giving up attitude.

Big thanks to Henriette Monsen, who made this lovely video, and allowed me to publish it on my mental health website!

Anxious and Afraid to Loose

Robin Williams – Another Life Lost Through Mental Illness

Another Life Lost Through Mental Illness

I recently wrote about “Celebrities and Bipolar Disorder,” many of whom are also drug addicts, alcoholics and suicide victims – but the recent death of Robin Williams has brought the issue of other mental health disorders including depression – and suicide to the front of my mind once again.

Of course, you know that Robin Williams died of “asphyxiation” – notable suicide by hanging. At first we were shocked, then sad as a great talent was lost. In a few days, many people will become angry at him. Many people don’t understand depression; some don’t even believe it exists.

Robin Williams - Depression KillsRobin – and I call him that purposefully rather than the more proper journalistic reference “Mr. Williams” or simply “Williams” – has made an impact on my life and that of my children. Like many people, I felt like I knew him. I haven’t seen all of the 80 movies he was in, but my personal favorites were the movies that were not comedies. He was a gifted actor and a tremendously funny man.

I said I “felt” like I knew him – but I didn’t. My children “feel” like they knew him – but they didn’t. I don’t know much about his childhood – other than that he was raised in a family where, though there was probably plenty of money, he spent most of his time with nannies or alone. He obviously had a brain that never quit – which leads me to believe he may have had ADHD, he certainly had troubles with substance abuse and he had periods of severe depression, one of which led to his death.

People are already questioning why such a talented man – who had given so much – would “go and do something like that.” Many of those people will feel like he was selfish – as many people feel like suicide is the ultimate in narcissism. Under all that hilarity, under all that spectacle, under all that talent, was a seriously sad man.

Never mind what we don’t know about his childhood, over the course of his life he had great success and tremendous loss, with the making of fortune and fame and the loss of loved ones and money. He ultimately chose to end the pain himself.

Metally Ill - Robin WilliamsDepression is not something that can be shared and Robin was a “smiler.” Even in my life, though I am not a “smiler” – when I am having great difficulty, I do not contact the people who matter. I do not call my friends; I do not call my family; I sit in my difficulties alone.

Like many comedians, Robin learned to be funny to cover pain and to cover loneliness – and to get attention that he craved. Mental illness is difficult to understand and even though we mourn his loss – we should reflect on who in our lives might be feeling the same pain.

Maybe – likely not, but maybe, if he had the kind of support he needed, if he had not felt like he always needed to be “on” he would not have felt the despair so strongly. Maybe if mental illness and substance abuse weren’t still stigmatized, maybe he could have gotten the help he needed.

Maybe, but maybe not.

Another famous actor – once said in a famous movie – “Momma says that dyin’ is a part of livin’… I wish that it wasn’t.” Unfortunately, some people feel they must choose to die early. Robin did.

Melissa Lind

Another famous actor died because of mental illness

Depression in Children

It may not seem possible, and most people don’t want to think about depression in children.

Different from developmental disorders such as ADHD or Autism Spectrum Disorders and different from mental disorders such as Schizophrenia, which have obvious symptoms, Depression can occur in children.

Childhood DepressionUp until about 20 years ago, depression in children wasn’t widely recognized.  It wasn’t that the depression didn’t exist; it was undoubtedly just that we didn’t know about it.  Two decades ago, even if the child was aware that “something” was wrong, the parents, teachers, and other adults were likely to dismiss it as a “stage” or “phase” that the child was going through.

There were several reasons for that way of thinking, such as:

  • A belief that children didn’t get depression – adolescents were dismissed as “moody,” younger children were dismissed as “difficult.”
  • Medication available for depression wasn’t appropriate for children due to severe side effects.  Newer antidepressants were not available until Prozac was approved in 1988 for adults.  These medications known as “serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors” (SSRIs) were not approved for children until 2002 and to date, only Prozac is recommended for depression in children though Zoloft and Luvox may be used for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in children.
  • The long-term effects of depression were not yet known.  Depression at any age can contribute to chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

Today, we recognize childhood depression.  About 11 percent of children have experienced at least one episode of childhood depression before the age of 18, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Normal behavior can certainly vary from child to child and from age to age – as children are prone to “stages” that they will grow out of.  But if a child has an extended period of depression – it is something that should be properly addressed. Such serious issues should not be taken lightly.

Juveniles (those up to age 17) often have different symptoms of depression than those common in adults.  Children with depression may be excessively sad and lethargic, but depression may also show as:

  • Complaints of illness
  • Refusal to go to school
  • Clinging to a parent or caregiver
  • Excessive worrying
  • Sulking
  • Grouchiness
  • Anxiety
  • Acting out at school
  • Excessive negativeness
  • Feelings of being misunderstood

Depressed FeelingsThese symptoms are occasionally experienced by most children as they are growing up, but when symptoms persist for several months or interrupt normal activities and development, more investigation is needed.  One needs to find out what the cause may be.  If a child is being bullied – he or she may not want to go to school.  If a child complains of illness – it may truly be sick.  On the other hand if these events occur over and over, you need to discuss the problem with a doctor.  You may also need to see a child psychiatrist or psychologist.  In some cases, therapy may be warranted but in other cases, the child may benefit from medication suitable for depression.

In any event, you should not ignore symptoms of depression or any other mental illness signs – but investigate them.  It may be that your child is “going through a stage”, but it may be more serious.

Children complaining of illness may be depressed!

Bipolar Disorder – Euphoria vs. Dysphoria or Mixed Episode

Most symptoms of Manic Episodes appear to be positive

Manic-depression or Bipolar disorder is usually perceived on of two ways – a person who alternates between depression and euphoria – or a person who alternates between depression and craziness.

Often a person who is told that they are bipolar will identify one of those two states – and will object based on the fact that they have never been “euphoric“, and they have never been actually psychotic or “crazy”.

Bipolar disorder or Manic-Depression is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) – “the Bible” of psychiatric disorders – as “…clinical course that is characterized by the occurrence of one or more Manic Episodes…”

7 “points” retrieved from: DSM IV Criteria for Manic Episode – Food and Drug Administration

A distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood, lasting at least one week. With three or more of:

1. Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
2. Decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only three hours of sleep)
3. More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking
4. Flight of ideas, or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
5. Distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli)
6. Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school or sexually) or psychomotor agitation
7. Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)

There is another specifier – “The symptoms do not meet criteria for a Mixed Episode” which is left out in a lot of thought processes.

Bipolar - EuphoricOne problem that is often encountered when diagnosing Bipolar disorder – or when trying to convince someone who has Bipolar disorder that they do, indeed have the illness – is that most of the “symptoms” of a Manic Episode appear to be “positive” or “happy.”  If you examine the wording – it looks on the surface and is often described as periods of “Euphoria” or extreme happiness.

In truth, many people with Bipolar disorder don’t have periods of “euphoria,” they don’t have what is perceived as “inflated self-esteem or grandiosity“, and they don’t seek out “excessive involvement in pleasurable activities.”  They may have “dysphoria,” they may believe that they have to do everything themselves, they may experience psychomotor agitation…they may be in a really active bad mood.

This is a state of “dysphoria.”  It is also called a “mixed state” where the Manic Episode and the Depressive Episode occur at the same time.  Features may include the racing thoughts, irritability, lack of sleep, psychomotor agitation of a Manic Episode but also include anhedonia or lack of enjoyment, inappropriate guilt, or suicidal thoughts which are symptoms of depression.

Unfortunately, this disconnects in presentation, and lack of awareness of mixed states (in both the patient and some professionals) often gives the bipolar patient an “easy out” in acceptance of the diagnosis.

Melissa Lind

Mixed Episode or Manic Episode with Mixed Features is given too little attention!

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – OCD

Collecting, Organizing, Checking, Washing…. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a type of anxiety disorder.

OCD - Bug ObsessionIt is composed of two parts: Obsession and Compulsion.  Obsession is the portion of OCD that occupies your thoughts such as excessive concerns about cleanliness (my kids call this germophobia), extreme social fear, fear of harming someone, preoccupation with organization or other intrusive thoughts that create anxiety.  Compulsion is the physical manifestation of needing to do something about the obsessionsCompulsion results in behaviors such as ritualistic behaviors like excessive hand washing, repeatedly checking to make sure the stove is off, counting steps and other extreme behaviors such as hoarding.

OCD the Good
Once I while participating in a wedding, I was attending the rehearsal dinner at the home of the bride whose mother made the appetizers for over 200 people.  I was amazed at her management skills that made her capable of preparing appetizers from a single kitchen – right up until the time that when looking for the restroom adjacent to the laundry, I opened the pantry door.

There, staring at me were over 100 spice containers, of all the same brand, all the same size and all angled at a precise 45-degree angle so that the labels were all pointed exactly at my head.  I was so dumbfounded that I continued to stare and found that on the other shelves there were precise pyramids of 5 cans each of various vegetables – all the same brand, all the same size, with all the labels facing exactly the same direction.

Lining the floor were plastic bins, spaced 2 inches apart…exactly, containing 3 bags each of a variety of pasta, flour, rice…. all of course the same brand, carefully placed in the bin, with the label in exactly the same location.

This is OCD at its best – at least for others.  She had an obsession and a compulsion that created this superbly organized pantry.  Likely though, even this “good” OCD manifestation took up a lot of her time – and had a negative impact on her daily life and that of her family’s.

OCD is not always at its best however and can result in the opposite – hoarding.  I don’t have to go into this but if you haven’t seen it, you should watch “Hoarders” or “Hoarding, Buried Alive” for some insight.

OCD the Bad
In addition to situations like hoarding, OCD can also interfere with life in other ways.  I have a cousin with OCD, who before he was medicated, found himself unable to leave his driveway due to fears that he would back over a child with his car.  This caused him to spend hours – literally hours every morning starting the car, looking in the rear view mirror, getting out of the car to look behind it, getting back in the car, looking in the rear view mirror, getting out of the car….  He eventually found himself unable to work.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - OCD Confused MindOthers have found that OCD has limited their lives in similar ways.  Howie Mandel, a well-known comic, has talked about his Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.  It prevented him from appearing in public for many years, in part due to social fear but also due to fear of infection.  Even today, while his disease is “under control,” he does not ever shake hands or allow others to touch him.

How do I know if I have OCD?
A lot of people have rituals – such as specific routines before bed.  A lot of people have extreme concerns which may consume thoughts for a while – such as excessive concerns over money.  The difference in “normal” rituals and “normal” concerns is that they don’t typically impair normal life and they don’t become paralyzing.

Thoughts and behaviors that might indicate OCD:
•    Repeated thoughts or mental pictures about things such as
o    Germs
o    Dirt
o    Intruders
o    Violence
o    Hurting others
o    Embarrassment
o    Disorganization
o    Religious beliefs
•    Repeated behaviors such as:
o    Washing hands
o    Disinfecting surfaces
o    Locking and unlocking doors
o    Counting
o    Repeating steps over and over
o    Keeping unneeded things
o    Excessive grooming
•    Lack of ability to control or stop unwanted thoughts and behaviors
•    Repeated behaviors provide temporary relief from anxiety that is caused by obsessive thoughts
•    Repeated behaviors don’t provide any pleasure other than temporary relief
•    Spending at least 1 hour a day on thoughts and behaviors, creating a negative impact on daily life

The International OCD foundation reports that it takes around 15 years for most people to be diagnosed.  This may be due to hiding of symptoms – but it may also be due to lack of awareness of both the public and health professionals.

What can be done about OCD?
OCD can be treated – it usually cannot be cured but can be controlled.  First line treatment for OCD includes working with a properly trained therapist – most beneficially, one who is trained in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).  CBT uses “exposure to” unpleasant stimuli, carried on to the “what if” stage.  “What if” I touch that faucet without disinfecting it?  “What if” I get into the elevator without opening the door 10 times?  The “exposure” period is followed by “response prevention” where the patient chooses NOT to perform the behavior that the “exposure” usually causes.  Over time, the obsession and compulsive thoughts and behaviors become more manageable.
In other cases, medication may be needed – usually given in combination with CBT.  Some antidepressants (not all) will help with OCD.  Anti-depressants that have been shown to help include:
o    Luvox (fluvoxamine)
o    Prozac (fluoxetine)
o    Zoloft (sertraline)
o    Paxil (paroxetine)
o    Celexa (citalopram)
o    Lexapro (escitalopram)
o    Effexor (venlafaxine)

Other medications may also help but have not been “approved” to treat OCD.  Doctors who have found them helpful may use them regardless of whether they are officially approved to treat OCDMedications such as Cymbalta (duloxetine) have been reported to be helpful – and some patients may benefit from short-term use of anti-anxiety agents.

It is important to know that all medications may cause side effects and you should tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking.

Melissa Lind

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts that produce anxiety and by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing that anxiety.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder can be treated!