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Physical and Mental Health

The category of Physical and Mental Health includes several illnesses and disorders

Psychologically and Physiologically Addictive Medications

Are antidepressants psychologically or physiologically addictive? – Kind of – but not in the way that you think!

For many years, most of the medical community have held steadfast to the idea that antidepressants were not “addictive.” But many Prescription Pain Medicationof those, not in the medical community or those with no personal experience of drug abuse or psychiatric illness, were convinced that those happypills were subject to abuse.  In fact, both were wrong.  Antidepressants are not “abusable“, but they are sort of “addiciting“.

To be clear – antidepressants are not subject to abuse.  They do not produce a “high” or anything like intoxication.  There is no immediate reward for taking antidepressants; in fact, one of the most troublesome things about antidepressants is that they take several weeks to actually work.

However, there is a difference between “abusabledrugs and “addictivedrugs.  Addiction is generally thought of as a psychological illness – in the way that marijuana and cocaine are psychologically addictive.  There is little evidence that either drug is physiologically addictive.  The body does not become dependent on the drug… the brain may – but not the body.

On the other hand, some medications are physiologically addictive – without being psychologically addictiveHormones are an example of this.  Once you start taking hormones (such as estrogen replacement), your body will adjust to the presence of the Psychologically Drug Addicted Dreammedication – and if suddenly discontinued, will not function normally.  There are many other examples of this, but you get the point.

Drugs like heroin, alcohol, and tobacco are psychologically addictive – but they are also physiologically addictive.  In addition to the brain “wanting” them, the body “needs” them to function normally.  If you suddenly take away the heroin, a severe withdrawal syndrome will begin.  If you suddenly take away alcohol – you may have seizures and a number of life-threatening conditions.

Prescription pain medications and anti-anxiety agents, when taken inappropriately can also be both psychologically and physiologically addictive – like heroin and alcohol.  When taken as prescribed, they are often still physiologically addictive.

Back to the antidepressants.

Certainly, years ago, sudden withdrawal of prescription antidepressants was known to be dangerous. But, with the development of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac, Paxil, and many others, most people have believed that there was no chance of physical addiction, and there would be no withdrawal.

Over the years, I would hear about people who complained of “withdrawal” symptoms which I dismissed – like most people in the medical community.  Many of these patients also had a myriad of complaints – generalized pain, foggy thinking, and other things that were considered to be indicative of a hypochondriac or chronic complainer.  Turns out maybe I was wrong.

SSRIs and other “next generation” antidepressants CAN cause withdrawal symptoms.  Some (not all but some) patients may experience symptoms of withdrawal such as Anxiety.

  • Anxiety
  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Depression and mood swings
  • Light-headedness and dizziness
  • Fatigue, headache and flu-like symptoms
  • Electric shock sensations
  • Loss of coordination, tremors and muscle spasms
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping

Most people don’t experience these – or have only a mild reaction.  Unfortunately, even “tapering” down won’t make that much difference as the symptoms may take a long time to go away – but the withdrawal is real and shouldn’t be dismissed!

Melissa Lind

Depression and Anxiety Disorders – Find Treatments

Demystifying Myths around Mental Health Problems

What are signs that someone is depressed?

What is the treatment for borderline personality disorder? Learn these answers to these questions and more when you view this site about types of depression and anxiety disorders.

Dealing with psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression, is a daily challenge for sufferers. If you think you or someone you love may be coping with one of these ailments, you probably have many questions, including, “What are signs that someone is depressed?” or “What is the treatment for borderline personality disorder?,” you are sure to find the answers you need here.

This site features all sorts of information about various types of depression and anxiety disorders.

It is important to remember that professional treatment should be sought if you or your loved one is truly struggling. The facts you see here are merely meant to guide you through the process of understanding these disorders; they are not designed to replace actual counseling and therapy.

Best wishes as you begin the road to recovery.

What are signs that someone is depressed?

What is the treatment for borderline personality disorder?

Dealing with psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression, is a daily challenge for sufferers.

Borderline Personality DisorderIf you think you or someone you love may be coping with one of these ailments, you probably have many questions, including, “What are signs that someone is depressed?” or “What is the treatment for borderline personality disorder?

You are sure to find the answers you need here. This site features all sorts of information about various types of depression and anxiety disorders. If you or your loved one is truly struggling, it is important to remember that professional treatment should be sought. The facts you see here are merely meant to guide you through the process of understanding these disorders; they are not designed to replace actual counseling and therapy.

Best wishes as you begin the road to recovery.

Mental Health and Different Kinds of Disorders

Mental Health – Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Anxiety and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

Signs of Stress

Take signs of stress seriously

As I stated before, stress, in itself, is not a bad thing. What is a bad thing is a long exposure to stress. This will “wear out the machine”, so to speak.

But what are the signs of stress? And do we need to be alarmed at each one of them?

No, of course not. There are some normal signs of “normal” stress. They are not necessarily pleasant to feel, but they are not dangerous, and they are quite useful, in fact. Then, if the stress gets more intense or is keeping on, the signs become more unpleasant and in this case, there are good reasons to stop and change behavior. If not, you will get into a stressed state, close to burnout.

The problem is that most often, people first will react when they are “in the red”, so to speak.

Let’s see the signs and how alarmed you should be:

Normal signs of normal stress:

– From time to time, quicker heartbeat, (not constantly!)
– From time to time, feel a bit shaky or small tic appear.
– You sweat more than usual.
– Feel like your mouth is dry.
– Tickling in your belly or stomach.
– Your belly or chest feels compressed.
– You are tense.
– You often feel like urinating.

Those signs are normal for a tense and stressed situation. Of course, it is not pleasant, but there is no danger.

Signs to take as a warning:

– You are very tired.
– You do not sleep well at night.
– You speculate all the time.
– Your body is in constant movement (fingers, legs, feet…)
– You are irritated.
– You cry easily.
– You are quiet.

In this case, it means you have to stop now and to act in consequence. You have been under too much stress (and possibly for too long), and it is now time to take a break.

Signs that now, you HAVE to stop:

– Forgetful, you forget things; you are not “here”.
– Problems with eczema or different sickness.
– Aches you can’t understand where they come from and why.
– Unsociable.
– Overusing stimulants: cigarettes, alcohol, etc.
Aggression.
Problems with your stomach.
– Bleeding.

StressedIn these cases, you have gone far too long and far too far and you are close to end up in the hospital or burned out. It is of outmost importance that you stop whatever you are doing, or your body will oblige you to do so… and that will not be a pleasant way to do it.

Be aware of the signs of stress. Do not overlook them. Take them seriously. No need to panic at the first signs, and of course, everyone can take a bit of stress (even though some of us are coping better with stress than some others). But do not let it go too far. It is your health; we are speaking about.

Positive and Negative Stress

Positive stress compared to negative stress

As we saw earlier, stress is a necessary factor for our survival as a specie. But it is also what might kill us. One of the problems Grumpy and Negativewith stress is that we need a small amount of stress to survive and to take care of some situations.

There is no reason to panic just because you get into a situation which stresses you. It is, for example, normal to have a small amount of stress before you have to go to an examination or before you participate in an important meeting. In this case, it is a good thing; it means you will be more attentive and more aware of your surroundings. That is really helpful.

Stress is helping you to take care of important situations

We get inattentive to stress symptoms because we are somehow used to them, kind of. We know them; we need them, and we are used to them. So we tend not to take them seriously in time.

Stress, in itself, is never negative. What is negative is if you are in a constant state of stress. If your body and mind never relax, never get out of stress, then you will literally burn out all of your reserves. IPositive Heartn short, if you do not stop stressing by yourself, there will be a moment when your body will do it for you. This is the so-called: Burned out.

When you first reach the point of burnout, you will have to rest. You won’t be able to do anything else anyway. But instead of using a few minutes or hours, like you would have done in a normal situation, it will easily take up to few years.

Stress, in itself, isn’t a bad thing or a negative thing.

There is only positive stress, so to speak.

It`s helping us out to survive.

Stress factorBut there can be a negative result of stress if you are constantly in this state of being. A bit like, if your car can drive at a maximum of 100 m/h and, with a especially additive in the gas, you can make it drive at 110 m/h. And then drive it constantly at 110 m/h.

Sooner or later, the motor will burn out.

It is the exact same thing with stress: Even though it is a positive additive that makes us work better, the outcome is negative if we are constantly running at maximum speed.

So no, there is no negative stress, only negative result of long time exposure, and only positive stress.

The Biology of Stress

Biology of Stress – Another state of mind – another physical state

Stress has always existed. It is a natural phenomenon that humans and animals have in common. We know for sure that all mammals (hereby also humans) stress. It is the same hormones which are activated for all mammals, and it is driven by the same area of the brain, namely the primitive part of the brain, deep inside the organ.

Humans have this part of the brain in common with all other mammals, but we have an exterior part of the brain, a couple of “layers”, so to speak, which is very developed. Not all mammals have as much brain-material around their primitive brain.

This developed part of our brain is a good thing; this is what gives us a very developed social life. But it is not always good when we speak about stress, because this part of the brain may produce stress, just by the power of thoughts.

Stress has an influence on all our body

When we are stressed, we release a stress hormone, which means that we get into another state. Generally, we get in this situation if we feel we are in danger, and we are getting ready to fight or flee: Adrenalin gets pumped up in our body; our heart beats quicker; our muscles get ready for action (fight or flight) and get tense. Then, another hormone is released: Cortisol. That hormone gives us some extra power by using a significant amount of energy from our body.

All of our senses are sharpened, and this is why, when we are under stress, we are more efficient. We are more attentive to what is happening and, therefore; we can easier do more than one thing at a time, we are more efficient, we can remember better.

So stress isn’t a bad thing, so to speak. It has its justification and a good reason to be here.

StressNow, as you can see the state in which our mind and body go to be an acute state. That means that it is a state of being used for an extreme situation. (Generally dangerous ones.) All these hormones and that heightened state we are in are not meant to be a constant state. It is supposed to be used in acute situations.

Dangerous stress situations arises

Stress hormones get pumped up – Your “machine” is getting boosted – You can take care of the situation (or flee from it) – Hormones stop pumping up, and you need rest, so the whole machine is getting back to its usual state. It takes a few minutes before the level of stress hormones is going down, and it will take hours before your body is back in “normal-mode”.

It is no surprise that if you are constantly in “high awareness mode” with Adrenaline and Cortisol almost constantly pumping in your system, this will not do you good.

It is a state supposed to be used on rare occasions, not a state you are supposed to be in for a long period of time. Your body wasn’t built for that.

Biology of Stress