Archives for 

bipolar depression

Bipolar Disorder and Exercise

Does Exercise Help with Bipolar Disorder?

Everyone knows that exercise is good for your health.  It is a no-brainer, and it is repeated so often that you have probably gotten tired of it.  I know I should do some physical activity. It is good for my heart, my bones… blah, blah, blah.

Bipolar DepressionOn the other hand, aside from needing to exercise because I am getting old and tired – the idea, that exercise might be good for my Bipolar Disorder, might just motivate me to do it.
Nothing else has.

A research study conducted in 2012 showed that exercise may have positive benefits for people with Bipolar Disorder.  I should have thought of that – but I didn’t (probably because I am bipolar and tend to ignore obvious things that might help me).

When asked – I have given advice to those who have depression (major depressive disorder, clinical depression, situational depression – or even bipolar depression).  What I tell those people is in addition to taking their meds, they should get up.  Get out of bed, get outside, and get some exercise – even if it is just around the kitchen.  Exercise increases the blood supply to your brain and helps to rise your energy levels – even if you don’t want to, it will do you some good.

Bipolar Disorder ShadowI give that advice to people when they are depressed, but I am not usually depressed.  My disorder tends toward mania or at least a mixed mood state.  So I don’t think about the need to increase my energy level.

Evidence has shown that exercise has some positive effects for people with Bipolar Disorder – even those that are not depressed.  In addition to the obvious health benefits, it can help to regulate your mood levels and “bring structure to chaos”.

As “bipolar“, we are often subject to disorderDisordered mind, disordered days, disordered environment.  One of the biggest tools for a bipolar patient to get and keep their body and mind regulated is the establishment of a schedule.

Go to bed at bedtime (and not at 2 am when you fall asleep in front of the TV). Get up in the morning, go to work on time, eat on a schedule – and take your meds when you should.
Establishing a routine does, in fact, help to keep from extreme ups and downs.

Exercise can be a big part of this – and physically reinforce a schedule on your body – that then affects your brain.  Just like getting up at the same time and going to sleep at the same time helps to establish a normal circadian rhythmexercise can reinforce that in a big way.

There are other benefits to exercise as well.  Physical activity naturally increases blood flow to the brain, which gives it the best chance of functioning at optimum level. It also helps to “clear out the cobwebs” that can be especially important if you are teetering on the edge.
Bipolar ExerciseExercise can increase your self-esteem that may have taken many blows in the past.  It can also increase social activity – that is apparently good for you, even if you don’t like people.  I don’t.

In my opinion, the biggest benefit may be “getting in touch” with your body.  When you exercise, you are more likely to stay within yourself.  One of the greatest problems in people with any mental disorder, and one of the reasons why people abuse drugs or perform any other risky behavior is the inability to be comfortable within your skin.  If you are exercising, you don’t really have a choice; you have to stay there.  Over time, you feel better about yourself, you feel more comfortable there, and you learn what is and isn’t “normal” within your body.

Perhaps this can lead you to better response when something is going amiss – when you may be slipping into disorder.

I tend to disregard the advice given by those who are not bipolar experts… either those with Bipolar Disorder or those who know the disease intimately, but this advice looks pretty solid to me.

Exercise and take your medicines!

Melissa Lind

Bipolar Disorder and Exercise as text to speech article

(Mental health video for blind and partially sighted people)

Suicide in Depression

Why does treatment for depression increase the risk of suicide?

Whether you are bipolar or suffer from major depressive disorder – when you start taking medication for depression, your risk of suicide actually goes up for a short period of time.

The risk of suicide in depression

Every time an advertisement for a medication for depressive disorder or bipolar depression comes on the television, one thing that seems to stick out is the warning that states “May increase the risk of suicide“.  This is often an arguing point for people who are opposed to psychiatric medications.  If it is supposed to improve your mood, why does the risk of suicide go up?  Shouldn’t the opposite be true?

How do antidepressants work?

Antidepressant medications work by increasing the activity of neurotransmitters in the mood centers of the brain.  Nerve cell signals are transmitted by the release of chemicals known as neurotransmitters.  These include naturally occurring chemicals such as serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine.  The neurotransmitter is released from one cell which signals the next cell to react.  The same cell then “gathers up” the neurotransmitter to be used again later.

Most antidepressants specifically work by blocking the “reuptake” of neurotransmitters so that they are in the synapses or spaces between the nerve cells for a longer period of time.  This increases the likelihood that the neurotransmitter will send a “happy” signal to the next cell – sooner.

Why do antidepressants increase the risk of suicide?

Suicide and DepressionThe problem with depression and how long it takes to recover is twofold, because depression involves both mood and energy levels.  In a person with depression, the mood state is lowered because there are often not enough neurotransmitters available.  This leads to the mental effects of depression causing sadness and an inability to enjoy normal activities.  There is also a corresponding drop in energy levels making the victim lethargic and sleepy.

When antidepressants are prescribed, most healthcare practitioners make it pretty clear that the mood state will not really begin to get noticeably better for at least 2 to 3 weeks. What is not always made clear is that energy levels actually begin to improve before the mood level is increased.

Once this person with low mood level and low energy level begins to take antidepressant medication, their energy levels go up fairly quickly.  The mood level, however, stays depressed – sad and unable to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

If patients had been thinking of suicide as part of their depression, they may not have had the energy to make actual plans or to carry them out.  Once their energy levels are boosted – they may find themselves still having the same thoughts, but this time – able to act.

Are the newer medications worse?

This increased risk of suicide is not new, despite what the media has portrayed.  It is not specific to a certain medication or even a certain kind of medication.  It is a fact, a well-known risk that has existed since the beginnings of treatment of depression.

Suicide and MedicationOur medications, today, are really much less dangerous than medications of old.  Thirty years ago, your choices for the treatment of depression included only tricyclics such as Elavil and Tofranil or MAO inhibitors such as Parnate.  Both of these medication types carried a lot of very debilitating side effects (dry mouth, constipation, excessive sweating, dizziness, and food intolerances) as well as the increased risk of suicide.  While they were effective, they were also quite dangerous in the event of an overdose – possibly resulting in death.

We now have more advanced medications – the SSRIs or Serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors, Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) and newer MAO inhibitors that have much fewer side effects and are less likely to result in a serious overdose – but they have not been able to eliminate the actual risk of suicide.  This is inherent in the treatment of depression because the energy improves before the mood.

With older medications, the psychiatrist would often only prescribe a few days’ worth of medication at a time because the old medications could be dangerous if too many were taken and lead to overdose by someone trying to commit suicide.  This often meant that the patient was seen once a week or more often during the first month.

Now that overdose is not such a risk, physicians often prescribe an entire months’ worth of meds at once, and no one keeps track of the patient during this dangerous period  – giving them plenty of time to plan and act.  Generally the newer medications cannot be used as a suicide tool but it does not stop patients from finding other tools.

What can help decrease the risk?

The solution is to know your patient – know your friends, know your family.  If you have a friend or relative who has been depressed and is placed on medication, be aware.Check on them frequently. Drag them around to social activities, out to eat, to outdoor events. Note any changes or patterns that indicate they may be considering suicide.  Help them through the funk.  You may get on their nerves, but you may also save their life.

A little effort and toleration of irritating friends is way better than going to a funeral and wishing you had done something.

 

Newer medications used for prevention of suicide in depression are much less dangerous than medications of old.

Counseling for Depression

Depression does require medication.

If you suffer from depression, and your doctor has prescribed an antidepressant for you, you will find that, in about three weeks, you are able to function in your life again — even while taking the medication.

Depression MedicationUnfortunately, this gives people a sense of “I’m all better now” that isn’t quite true. You see; depression does require medication, but it also requires counseling. Without proper counseling, you will never get to the root of the problem — what is causing the depression. The medication will not make that go away — it only deals with the symptoms of depression.

Counseling is needed to deal with the cause of the depression.

Counseling for depression may have two parts. The first part may be traditional therapy so that the counselor can help you to discover what the problem is, in the event that you do not already know. Sometimes depression has no visible cause. Other times, it may be caused by a physical condition that does not need any counseling at all — the depression lifts when the condition is treated.

So, traditional therapy may be needed, but that will usually be followed with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBTCognitive Behavioral Therapy essentially teaches you a new way of thinking — a new way of looking at or approaching a problem, — something that enables you to deal with the problem in a more constructive, timely manner. Once the problem that is causing the depression is taken care of, the depressed state lifts.

CBT can take anywhere from 12-20 weeks. Furthermore, depending on the severity of your depression, your doctor may not feel that counseling should be sought until the medication prescribed has a chance to work. On the other hand, he (or she) may think that the depression warrants immediate counseling. This varies from one individual to another.

Note that most therapists are not licensed to prescribe medication. That requires a medical doctor or a psychiatrist.

Understanding Mental Illness and Diagnosis

Many people are confused by mental illness and many will claim that they simply do not exist.

Mental Illness - Sad TeenagerThey mean that such conditions are caused by the persons experiencing it. However, every day there are counselors who are diagnosing people as having a mental illness conditions. The disease is difficult to determine because of this, whether or not a diagnosis is correct. Also because of this, there are many controversies surrounding these conditions.

Mental health is essential for everyday life. Most people are fit to go through life without glitches in their mental activity, but others seem to have constant interruptions. It`s these interruptions that show us that there is something going wrong in the brain of these individuals and that there is an existing problem.

To understand interruptions that occur in the brain we need to look at different diagnoses and symptoms. We could use bipolar depression for this example. Bipolarity is one of the most common disorders diagnosed in today`s society. In fact, you probably know someone with bipolar depression you just don`t know that they have it. Bipolar disorder is extremely common, but many people do not fully understand the condition.

Bipolar is a chemical imbalance in the brain. Meaning; the brain is denied of vital nutrients that it needs to maintain a stable mindset. Since lots of people are diagnosed bipolar, they do not have their whole life experiences taken into consideration; this can be an enormous problem for them.

We all experience stress, trauma and excitement in our lives. However, not everybody deals with these stressors the same way as somebody else would do. No one should be expected to cope with such stressors the same way as everybody else would do. There is a process that takes place that brings on the condition of bipolar depression.

The first thing we must consider is that all have some “triggers” in life. That triggers might be traumatic events that occur in one’s life. Now, everybody deals with these differently.

Some people will react negatively, and others ignore. Those individuals who ignore these issues are generally not hearing the messages in between. This is how we can separate a mentally ill mind from a so called “normal” way of thinking.

The mentally ill mind tends to consume everything in life that is said. They get it all, and they fell all of that process in their heads until this begins to cause confusion. The “normal” mind tends to listen only to what it wants to listen to, and they do not have these conflicting thoughts to cause the mental confusion.

To better understand this process, it helps also to understand cognitive mental health disorders and how these are related to the confusion that occurs in the mind.

Curse of the Ferrari Brain: the Other Side of Bipolar Disorder

Manic Episode: Another Side of Bipolar Disorder.

Welcome back, my friends!

My apologies for the extended absence. I’ve been very busy with other projects, which I’ll have to return to soon. Also, I wanted to make sure this article was perfect, because this one’s a little tricky.

So far, most of my articles have focused on depression. As someone with type II bipolar disorder, that’s the side I know best. Also, it’s the side that’s easiest for a person who doesn’t have bipolar disorder to understand. Everyone has been bummed at some point. Wanna understand bipolar depression? Take your depression, magnify by about a jillion, and there ya go. Pretty easy to understand, right? The other side of the coin isn’t as straightforward. A good metaphor, I hope, will make it easier to understand.

Let’s say that the average human brain is like a Volvo.The Volvo gets great mileage and is one of the safest, most dependable cars on the road. You wanna get to work on time, day after day and with very little fuss and worry? A Volvo is the car for you.Average human brain - Volvo

The bipolar brain is more like a Ferrari.

Bipolar brain - like a Ferrai

“Farrah”

The Ferrari is fast and flashy. Its sleek, predatory looks practically demand that you drive it at dangerous speeds. You want to make it to work in forty seconds flat? Then the Ferrari is the car for you. Unfortunately, it guzzles gas like your Aunt Janie guzzles gin and tends to spend more time in the shop than on the road. The insurance premiums are astronomical and you are almost guaranteed to wrap it around a tree someday.

Now then… bipolar depression is like the times when the Ferrari is in the shop. It’s up on the lift, and you’re going nowhere. You can’t even show it off by rolling it into your driveway. Not only that, but you gotta walk to work while all the Volvo drivers practically blaze by at 35 mph. In your mind’s eye, they laugh at you as it starts to rain. Your anxiety tells you they are ALL aiming for puddles near you, and the occasional sociopath WILL soak you for his or her amusement.

But then the shop owner calls. Your chariot awaits! You go down to the shop, pay the exorbitant bill, and fire up that 16-cylinder Italian ego trip.

“I’ve missed you, Farrah,” you say, not caring about the look the shop owner gives you. If HE had a Ferrari, he’d name her Farrah, too. Your foot barely taps her gas pedal and she purrs delightedly. She’s missed you, too.

“Good girl,” you say, then ease Farrah’s shifter into first, the action so smooth that instinct alone tells you that she’s out of neutral. You pull out of the shop’s parking lot and into traffic. At first, she’s just glad to be off of that horrible rack and back on the road where she belongs, but every red light, every school zone is an irritant, and sand only makes pearls in oysters. Sand in an engine is death, but Farrah complies and stays below the speed limit… for now.

As you pull into the parking lot at work, all eyes turn to you and your beautiful machine. You pull into your space and reach for the key to kill her ignition, but you stop short.

“It’s been so long. Just once,” she begs. “Pretty please?”

You know this is how it starts, but you’re still in control. Just once won’t hurt anything, right? It’s not like you’re doing anything dangerous. Besides, what’s the point in owning a car like Farrah if you can’t show her off?

With Farrah’s gears in neutral, your foot presses hard on her accelerator and her engine screams ecstatically. Those who weren’t looking before certainly are now. Many are impressed. Many others are jealous. And Farrah, at long last, feels warm and tingly.

“Mmm… baby,” she purrs. “You’re the only one who knows how to touch me right. Again. Please.”

“Sorry, babe,” you say, a little defeated. “I gotta go to work now.”

Farrah pouts as you shut off the engine, sputtering just a little to let you know she’s put out. You promise her a full tank of premium and a stretch of deserted highway tonight followed by a loving sponge bath. You know that will make her happy, but she’s still sulking.

When five o’clock rolls around, you dash into the parking lot to find Farrah waiting. It’s a beautiful day, so you decide a little sun would be good for you both. You drop her top, fire up her engine and gun the accelerator—just a little—as you exit the parking lot. No harm done, and at last you’re out on the open road where both of you are more happy… for all of about twenty seconds.

Gridlock. No one’s going anywhere fast. The traffic jam drives you nuts, but you try to smile regardless. You’ve gotten so many “nice car, man” comments from the Volvos that your ego has slipped into overdrive. Eventually, though, it gets old. You’re sick of hearing how nice your car is. You wanna FEEL how nice she is, and in this traffic, how can you? You can’t even get out of first gear! You’ve got to MOVE!

Speed isn’t Farrah’s only good quality. She maneuvers like… well… like a gdamn Ferrari! Each time you see an opening in traffic, you seize it. At first, you make sure there’s plenty of space, but soon ANY amount of space is enough as long as it moves you forward. Other drivers stop saying “nice car” and start saying “watch it, a-hole!”

“Fuc.. them,” Farrah says. “They’re just jealous, baby.”

Finally, you come upon a stretch of open highway, just begging to be devoured. You stomp Farrah’s accelerator and instantly know that what she said is true. Who wouldn’t be jealous of this speed? This freedom?

“At last!” she screams as you tear away from the nightmare behind you. The wind whips your hair as the speedometer climbs. This is what she’s DESIGNED to do, you tell yourself. It’s just you and Farrah and all is well in the world. You drive off into the sunset, victorious, just like in the movies.

But real life isn’t the movies, and sunset only means the end of the day, not the end of the film. You pull into your garage and park Farrah for the night. You have to work in the morning, but you’re too wired to sleep. You try watching TV. You try a hot shower. Nothing works. Sleep just won’t come, not with Farrah calling to you from the garage.

“Sleep is for those Volvo people,” she says, spitting out the word Volvo as if it had the arsenic taste of bitter almonds. “You’re better than them, baby. All you need is me. Come on. Let’s go for a drive.”

But you know better. You’ve been down this road before. With the help of a few Benadryl, you ignore her voice and drift off, but your sleep isn’t like real sleep. Your body lays motionless but your mind spins like a screeching tire. Dreams and reality melt together for a few fitful hours of sleep and traffic nightmares.

You’re awake long before sunrise, but you force yourself to stay in bed until the alarm goes off, then you’re up in a flash. You sing in the shower. You skip breakfast. You rush to the garage.

“Good morning, sexy,” she says. “Ready to play?”

“Are you?” you ask, smirking as you sink into a kid leather bucket seat that fits you like a glove. You deftly slip your key in her ignition and give it a twist. As you pull on your driving gloves, the temperature gauge begins to rise. “Like that, do you?”

“Sailor baby, you get me hotter than Georgia asphalt,” she purrs.

You bet your sweet a-h I do, you think as the garage door rises to release you from your prison. Your house isn’t your home. Here with her. This is home. This is where you belong.

Now, there are two different ways this scenario can end…

END #1

The garage door is barely up before you’re skidding out of the garage and into… another fu–ing traffic jam! No! No no no no NO NO NO!!! You honk madly. Farrah’s engine growls at any Volvos who get too close. The admiration in the Volvo drivers’ eyes is gone. Today, they look upon you with fear, but you don’t give a damn. They’re just in your way, anyway, right? One Volvo tries to pull in front of you. You stomp the accelerator and he weaves out of your way just in time.

“My lane, a-hole,” you shout. “Mine!”

Your lane or not, the traffic light turns red and you’re stuck. Time stands still. You scream and rev your engine, both you and Farrah quickly reaching redline. The temperature warning light comes on, but you ignore it. It just wants to slow you down, too. You smell oil smoke, but don’t care.

“Go baby,” Farrah shrieks. “Go! Go! GOOOO!”

KABLAM!

Something snaps. Thick gray smoke boils from the engine compartment. Farrah’s engine chokes and sputters as the light turns green. She’s got just enough strength to ease to the side of the road.

“This is all your fault,” she says, dying. You weep at what your anger has done.

The tow truck guy clucks his tongue as he winches Farrah’s front end into the sky. “Damn shame,” he says. “Such a nice car.”

In your mind, you finish his sentence. If only you knew how to treat it.

Welcome back to depression.

Or, it could end like this…

END #2

The garage door is barely up before you’re skidding out of the garage and onto the open road. Your floor it and Farrah jumps over the speed limit like an antelope. There’s no traffic, no cops, nothing but miles of open road. You cut each corner closer, but not because you’re out of control. You do it because you’re fucking amazing! Every move you make is the right one. The world is yours and everything is perfect…

…until you run out of gas in the middle of nowhere during a thunderstorm and have to walk to the nearest payphone (you forgot your cell in your hurry to hit the road) only to find you don’t have any change, so you have to walk all the way back to your house. Once at your house, you reach into your pocket and find that you’ve lost your keys somewhere along the way.

Welcome back to depression.

George Carlin, one of the funniest men to ever live, once said that the cliché phrase “more than happy” sounded like a medical condition.” Well, he was right. “More than happy” is called euphoria, and euphoria is sometimes a symptom of a manic episode. Sometimes, bipolar disorder feels WONDERFUL. At the beginning of the upswing, you have hypomania, and hypomania can be very, very good. It’s your chance to really shine.

Sometimes, when you’re hypomanic, you are the life of the party—charming, witty, friendly and filled with energy. Your mind becomes razor sharp, your reflexes like those of a kung fu master. You make friends easily, accomplish incredible amounts of work, and have flashes of brilliance that astound and amaze everyone around you. I LOVE it when hypomania works that way!

Sometimes, however, it doesn’t. Sometimes when you’re hypomanic, you are the total buzzkill—cranky, bitter, sullen… and yet still filled with energy. Your mind is sharp, but it’s your tongue that’s the razor. You’re nerves are so jittery you twitch. Fine silk feels like sandpaper against your skin. You still have that keen focus, but all you focus on is the neighbor’s g-damn stereo and if you had one ounce less of willpower, you’d crash right over and shove the thing straight up his a-h. But that wouldn’t fix the problem, because dammit, you’re pissed and you’re gonna stay that way. I HATE it when hypomania works that way.

Now, if you’re bipolar type II like me, hypomania is the ceiling. You hit it, stay there for anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks (depending on how rapidly you cycle) and then spiral back down into depression. If you’re type I bipolar, then hypomania is just the beginning.

Hypomania basically means “little mania,” so for a full-tilt manic episode, take my description of hypomania and magnify it exponentially: the occasional sleepless night becomes days on end without sleep; the occasional ego trip gives way to full-blown narcissism and delusions of grandeur; euphoria becomes psychosis; irritability becomes hostility and anxiety becomes outright paranoia. Some even experience hallucinations.

No matter how high the ladder goes, unless you drop dead from exhaustion (which does happen occasionally) or wrap your Ferrari around a tree (yes, those on the upswing really do tend to speed) then you’re going to find yourself right back where you started. For some, that’s a relatively normal mood. For others, it’s welcome back to depression. Hope you enjoyed the ride.

And on that note, I hope you, my readers, have enjoyed the ride. I’ll be taking a break from this blog now, but I’m sure I’ll be back I’ve got so many other stories, poems, screenplays and articles to write. I’ve got sketches to draw and music to compose. I’ve got a life without bipolar disorder… or at least a life without thinking about it all the time.

The one thing I want you to remember most of all is that NO ONE IS A DISEASE. They are a person with a disease. Their disease is not their life, at least not unless they allow it to be. Don’t do that, folks. It sucks. Be people. People are OK unless they won’t turn their g-damn stereos down.

Keep fighting, folks!

-Bruce Anderson

 

Words as Weapons – and Another Bipolar Myth Dispelled

Welcome back to the loony bin, my fellow freaks!

Before I get back to dispelling myths about bipolar disorder, I want to talk a little about words. As a writer, words are my bread and butter. Language can be powerful. It doesn’t just help us define reality, it shapes it. Just ask Pluto. Poor little Pluto isn’t a planet anymore. Why? Because we SAY it isn’t.

Wacko. Nutcase. Lunatic. Psycho. Freak.

Those words can be very powerful when used with evil intent. Some of you reading this might be offended by me referring to people who suffer from bipolar disorder with those sort of words. I can understand. Those words can really, really hurt. Especially Cheroceewhen they come from a “friend.” Trust me. I know. Keep in mind that I’m not just talking about people with bipolar disorder. I AM one of those people.

Just as words can make meaning, they can be made meaningless. It depends on two things: the person who’s saying them and his or her intent. Let me give you an example.

As a writer, I spend a lot of time indoors. I’m 1/8th Cherokee, so I WOULD tan well if I saw the sun more often than I do. The rest of my ancestry is European. Basically, my skin is as white as the driven snow. Now I’m going to say a word and then dive for cover.

Nigger.

Man… I feel crappy even typing that. That word was used by white people to oppress black people for a very long time. My people used that word like a weapon, and boy was it an effective one. It was the neutron bomb of the English language for very long time. That word was used to cause shame, which is why I feel ashamed just saying it once.

However, the N-word (sorry… I can’t bring myself to type it again) is only a weapon when it’s used like one. Watch any movie, go to any club, walk down any street and you’ll hear black people saying it to one another, joking around, even using it like a term of endearment. It’s OK for them to say it because they ARE black. Not only that, but they aren’t saying it with the intent to harm.

For me to say it? Not really OK. I can probably get away with it this one time because my INTENT is not to harm, but to help. Or at least I’m hoping I can. If not, please accept my sincerest apology.

Being bipolar, the nature of our illness ensures that we’re a sensitive bunch, but let’s try not to be too sensitive about words. They can only harm us if we let them. Let’s start with the one I hate the most:

Freak.

Freak freak freak freak FREAK FREAK FREAK!!!

If I say that word out loud, over and over, it starts to sound like a nonsense word, something I just made up. The more I use it, the less it means. The less it means the less power it has over me.

Try it for yourself. Pick the one word you hate the most and say it over and over. Make that word just as dead as the not-a-planet Pluto - not a planetPluto. Just don’t forget that your word isn’t dead to everyone. If that word bothers someone else, don’t say it around them. It’s all about kindness, folks. It’s that simple.

Well, once again, I’m over word count. And I haven’t even mentioned one myth, but I may have just dispelled one.

Bipolar Myth #3 – Being bipolar makes you a bad person.

I’m bipolar. If I was a bad person, would I go through as much effort as I have to avoid offending the black community? I hate the N-word as much as I hate “freak.” I hate ANY word used to make someone else feel like a second-class citizen.

There are people out there who are scared of people with bipolar disorder because of the actions of a few select individuals. Yes, there are some people with bipolarity who really are mean, vicious people who are dangerous to others. But there are many more people like that who DON’T have bipolar disorder.

Bipolar ImageMost of us are just like you. Some of us, and I’m not naming names here, are sensitive, loving fathers who try not to let their daughters see them cry during Disney movies.

OK. It’s me. I do that. Pathetic, right? Well… this whole article has been about freeing yourself from shame, so I might as well come out of the closet. Disney movies make me cry sometimes. That fact may actually make me a freak. Having bipolar disorder, however, doesn’t.

Until next time, my fellow freaks… keep fighting!

-Bruce Anderson

Click the link to read more from Bruce Anderson: How I Became the  Freak in the Corner