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depressed feelings

Seniors and Depression

Elderly people are often hiding their depression

Just as teenage depression has received more recognition and validation over the last decade, depression in senior citizens has also gained more attention. Teenagers are facing loads of issues — and seniors are as well, even though the effects are quite different.

Depression in ElderlySenior citizens have many worries. They are facing getting older and less capable of caring for themselves. They may be worried about outliving the funds they have set aside for their retirement. They may be facing significant changes, such as moving from their home to a retirement community or nursing home. They are also finding themselves surviving their friends.

One of the major concerns about depression in seniors is that the symptoms are not nearly as easy to identify as they would be in a child or a middle-aged adult. Senior citizens rarely tell people that they are depressed, and may not even recognize it as such. Even when the signs are noticed, they are often mistaken for other medical problems associated with age.

If a senior citizen stops taking part in active activities, this is a red flag. For instance, if an elderly lady has been going to get her hair done every week, for the last 30 years or so, and suddenly stops, you cannot assume that she just got old and stopped worrying about what her hair looked like. The culprit is probably depression. Think about the things that the elderly person had done before, and what they have recently stopped doing.

What you must remember is that today’s seniors may still consider depression to be a bad thing that one must hide from others. When they were children and then later, raising their families, if someone suffered from a mental condition — including depression — that person was thought to be either “crazy” or “incompetent.”

Naturally, since they were raised and lived in this mindset, they will try to hide their depressed feelings if and when they occur.

Senior seldom tells about their depression.

Depression in Young Children

Child’s may become depressed because of several different things

Today, we are more aware of teenage depression, but there still isn’t enough said about depression in younger children. Depression in young children is not as common as teenage depression, but it does still exist, and it is still a significant problem. Did you realize that even babies can suffer from depression?

Depression in ChildrenIn children, depression shows itself through developmental delays, failure to thrive, sleeping and eating problems, social withdrawal or anxiety, separation anxiety, and dangerous behavior. Unfortunately, children are not yet equipped to express depressed feelings in simple words. They may not even be old enough to know what those feelings are. So, for the most part, a child’s depression is expressed in other ways and actions.

When an adult becomes depressed, their first stop may be their medical doctor’s office, followed by an appointment with a therapist. With children, it does not necessarily work this way. Instead, you may need an appointment with a child psychologist so that an assessment for depression can be done, using the Children’s Depression Inventory.

If the child psychologist determines that the child is indeed depressed, he or she may want a physical workup done by the child’s pediatrician to determine whether the cause of the depression is physical. A child may be depressed because there is simply a family history of depression. (Genetically illness) Child’s become depressed because of things going on in their lives, or because of a medical problem.

In most cases of depression in children, the cause of the depression can be associated with more than one of these causes. So, if your child is found to be depressed, and medical reason for it is discovered, you should still seek out answers and determine if one of the other factors — problems in their lives or genetics — are also contributing.

The important thing is to watch your child closely. Is your child getting along with other children? Are they growing and developing as they should? If either of these things isn`t happening, you should seek help before the problem escalates.

Depression in children is not as common as depression in teenagers!