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depressive disorder

Getting Out of Depression

Some tips to get you out of depression

Major depression is the third most common mental disorder in the US.  Nearly 7 percent of the US population is affected in any one year.  Incidentally, if you are keeping track, the two most common mental disorders are Anxiety disorders and Phobia disorders, including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Major Depression, also called Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has an average onset of 32 years of age and is more common in women than in men.  It is also called “unipolar depression” by those who are familiar with Bipolar disorder.  It may include a subset of depressive disorders such as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which affects people yearly – usually in the winter and Dysthymic Disorder, which is a less severe form of depression.

In order to be diagnosed with Major Depression, a person must meet the DSM criteria including at least five of the following for at least two weeks:
•    Depressed mood most of the day
•    Diminished interest in all or most activities
•    Significant, unintentional weight loss or gain
•    Insomnia or sleeping too much
•    Agitation or psychomotor retardation (slow movement) noticeable by others
•    Fatigue
•    Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
•    Diminished ability to think or indecisiveness
•    Suicidal thoughts

In some cases, depression can be relieved by changes in lifestyle or with psychotherapy, but in severe cases – medication may be warranted.  We are fortunate today in that there are a number of effective medications that have fewer side effects than previous treatments, and the category continues to evolve.

Even with medication – that may not begin working for at least several weeks – some lifestyle changes, and habits may help a person “emerge” from their depression and manage symptoms in the future.

Major DepressionLifestyle changes are difficult, particularly when depressed, but the effort it takes to “soldier through” is worth it in the end.  These tips for helping with depression are not easy – especially when you do not have any energy and don’t feel like getting up, but even though they may not provide a cure – they almost always provide some help.

  1. Get up and move – this is the hardest for most people to do.  It may take a tremendous amount of efforts but even simply getting off the couch or out of bed and walking around the house will help.  Getting up and moving around will increase your blood flow and heart rate will help increase blood flow to your brain and may convince your body that “hibernation” is over.
  2. Get dressed – you may have been wearing the same clothes for many days.  Changing into a “daytime” outfit can help regulate your time clock and may help you feel like you can accomplish something.  If you wear makeup or fix your hair, do so – and by all means, take a shower.
  3. Get out in the sun – don’t stay long enough to get a sunburn but studies have shown that bright light helps your brain wake up.  It resets your internal clock by adjusting your melatonin levels (a hormone responsible for inducing sleep).  It also triggers a “springtime” effect – that again tells your brain and body that winter is over, and it is time to come out of hibernation.
  4. Talk to a friend – making a phone call may not be tops on your mind, but even a wordless chat can help you feel like someone else is aware of your existence.
  5. Watch something enjoyable – even if you don’t want to enjoy anything, do something that would normally make you happy.  Just a little bit of happiness peeking through can go a long way.
  6. Go to bed and get out of bed at normal hours – sleep patterns are often destroyed by depression.  Reestablishing those normal patterns will help reset your internal clock to a natural level.
  7. Don’t take naps – again with both the normal sleeping hours and with the “getting up.”  Reinforcing physiologic habits will help establish normal brain functioning.
  8. Eat healthily – you may want to eat everything, nothing, or only certain foods.  Likely, no matter how much or how little you are eating, you are deficient in some of the necessary vitamins and nutrients – so eating a healthy diet and taking a multivitamin mineral supplement is a good idea.  B vitamins are especially helpful to restore nerve cell functioning, C and E are useful for combating inflammation that can cause sluggishness, D vitamins are useful to aid in the “sunlight” phenomenon discussed before, Calcium and Magnesium are good for the brain cells which are malfunctioning.

Most people who are depressed will find a lot of these activities difficult – and you may only be able to do one or two a day.  None of this is meant to be insulting, but there is science behind all of it – and others have been through it before.
With the help from the medication and the lifestyle adjustments – you will feel like you are coming out of the fog – and be able to do all of them – or sometimes, choose not to.  Choosing not to do something is different than feeling like you are unable to do something – and you want to have control of your life.

– Melissa Lind

Critiques of Depression Medication

The use of depression medication in the treatment of mental illness is at an all-time high.

Depression MedicationThere is no reason to believe it will decline in the foreseeable future either. Depression diagnosed with increased frequency and antidepressants are the most popular means of treating the disorder. Antidepressants are extremely popularly. There are those, however, who are against using depression medication.

Some argue that the research support the effectiveness of the pharmaceuticals is over influenced by the financial interests of large pharmaceutical companies. They maintain that any statement of depression medication effectiveness should be disregarded because of the corrupt nature of the medical industry. Some may temper that perspective, arguing instead that the effectiveness of the pills is heavily overstated and over prescribed.

There are strong arguments to be made that the medical-governmental-industrial complex tends to be self-perpetuating and may not always have the greater good at the forefront. However, the wholesale rejection of available evidence based on bias is not particularly compelling to most analysts.

Even those who think less conspiratorially may oppose the use of depression medication. One common argument raised by objectors is that the medicines do not get at the root of the disease and instead act merely to mask its symptoms. They may state that it will be more difficult curing the disease and eliminating its triggers by masking the effects. They recommend therapy-based treatment programs to get to “the heart of the problem” instead of treating the issue with medication.

Others maintain that depression medication is simply too mysterious to be embraced. They argue that no one truly understands why the medications work and that, thus, there is reason to be concerned about what they may be doing to the mind of the patient. It is true that no one truly understands exactly why all antidepressants tend to produce the results they do. However, scientific research is beginning to reach more solid conclusions, which may render this objection outdated, in the near future.

Others opposed to the use of antidepressants base their arguments on religious beliefs or assessments of the severity of potential side effects associated with the use of drugs.

Critics of antidepressants offer alternative means of treatment. They often support aggressive therapy-based solutions, the use of improved nutrition and other acts in order to fight off the symptoms of a depressive disorder. Many advocate non-traditional treatment methods or more ancient practices designed to improve mental health.Healing in Present Moment

Despite a large chorus of detractors, however, the use of antidepressants continues unabated. The best available scientific evidence indicates that they are among the most successful treatment options, and doctors are prescribing the medications in increasing numbers every day. It would appear as though there is little likelihood that, in the near future, critics will restrict the use of depression medication.

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) – Additional Information

feeling-blueAdditional information to what is written on the page : “Menopause And Depression

Major depressive disorder (MDD)

(also known as recurrent depressive disorder, clinical depression, major depression, unipolar depression, or unipolar disorder) is a mental disorder characterized by an all-encompassing low mood accompanied by low self-esteem, and by loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities.

This cluster of symptoms (syndrome) was named, described and classified as one of the mood disorders in the 1980 edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic manual.
The term “depression” is ambiguous. It is often used to denote this syndrome but may refer to other mood disorders or to lower mood states lacking clinical significance.

Major depressive disorder is a disabling condition that adversely affects a person’s family, work or school life, sleeping and eating habits, and general health.
In the United States, around 3.4% of people with major depression commit suicide, and up to 60% of people who commit suicide had depression or another mood disorder.

Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person’s thoughts, behavior, feelings and physical well-being.
Depressed people may feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, worried, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, or restless.

They may lose interest in activities that once were pleasurable; experience loss of appetite or overeating, have problems concentrating, remembering details, or making decisions; and may contemplate or attempt suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, loss of energy, or aches, pains or digestive problems that are resistant to treatment may be present.