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Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Intermittent Explosive Disorder – More Than Just Anger

Intermittent Explosive Disorder (also called IED, that is appropriate as it can go off unexpectedly and cause significant damage)

Intermittent Hulk Explosive DisorderProbably everyone knows that teenage boy (or girl) who punched a hole through the wall.  Perhaps for some, this became a regular pattern of behavior during adolescence but most of those teenagers outgrew it.  In fact, at least one-quarter of teenage boys has done something dumb like punching a wall.

One boy I knew in high school even broke his hand by punching the roof of his car, and some boys were routinely doing stupid stuff.  Despite that, all of it was teenage angst and changes that can be attributed to the massive amounts of testosterone flowing through the male adolescent body – none of them had intermittent explosive disorder.

Intermittent Explosive Disorder is worse than punching a hole through a wall.

It typically is first identified in the early teens – but can be seen much earlier in some cases.    In order to be actually characterized as intermittent explosive disorder, an individual must have had three episodes of explosive behavior that is severely out of proportion to the stressor.

Intermittent Explosive Disorder HulkinsectThey must have broken or smashed something that is monetarily valuable (more than a few dollars), physically attacked or made explicit threats to attack someone with the intent of causing harm.  If these three episodes occur within the space of 12 months, the disorder is considered to be more severe.

Here is the catch.

How do you distinguish between IED, average – though extreme teenage behavior and other psychiatric conditions?  It turns out that IED is probably a diagnosis of “if nothing else fits” as other psychiatric disorders certainly overlap with similar symptoms – and you have to rule out the adolescent hormone issue.

Bipolar disorder may cause outbursts of extreme anger and agitation, Borderline personality disorder may cause outbreaks, ADHD patients can exhibit a severe lack of self-control, and drug abuse is always a potential cause.  Even though those diseases may cause IED-like events, a sustained behavior pattern is something to address.

Intermittent Explosive Disorder WarningA recent study reported by the National Institutes of Health shows that IED can actually affect up to 4 percent of adults and lead to an estimated 43 attacks over a lifespan.  The disorder may also increase that chance of depression, anxiety and substance abuse disorders.  People with IED have an obvious increased risk of legal trouble, financial difficulties, and divorce – that’s a no-brainer.

So the biggest problem for mental health professionals, like many other disorders, is to untangle all of the information leading in and out with a mix of behaviors and a mix of causes.  What came first – the chicken or the egg?  What came first – the drug abuse or the anger?  Which illness is more important – bipolar disorder or the IED?

One of the biggest clues may be in examining (or better, paying attention to) behavior that occurs before puberty.  In other words: What came first – the behavior or puberty?  Clearly if the behavior started before puberty, there was and is an issue.  If the behavior begins during adolescence – you have to wait (and hope) to see if the behavior goes away once the hormones are settled.

IED is not a simple diagnosis.

It requires a careful examination of an entire psychiatric and behavioral history – and the “ruling out” of a lot of other disorders that may be to blame.  Unfortunately, in the end – unless an underlying cause can be found, there is no medicationAnger management and cognitive behavioral therapy are likely the only answer – minimization of harm, not very satisfactory if it was your car window that got smashed in a fit of rage.

Melissa Lind

Knowledge Conquer the Shame of Mental Disorder

People Do Not Understand Mental Illness

Article as text, and with Video for blind and partially sighted people (Text-to-Speech Video article)


Suicide is not a weak or cowardly person that takes the lightweight solution. Suicide is a result of a disease called depression. With increased knowledge, understanding, with an increased understanding the shame disappears.

Bipolarity - Catherine Zeta-JonesCatherine Zeta-Jones has got a place in our hearts. Now that she has stood out as a bipolar, we love her only more. She is not only a great artist, but a woman with courage, rant, empathy and honesty. She is a role model for all girls who grow up in the day, and a daughter-in-law all mothers want.

But what about the ordinary man or lady in the street that does not have any film career behind him or her, that is not a familiar face among the population?

To expect a person that we have never heard of, or meant something about, should open and stand naked in front of a whole country and tell about his (or her) inner hell, is a lot to claim. But it is needed to break down the taboo by having it painful.

The constant negativity is not something a depressed person has decided to have, but the result of the disorder depression.

And when it`s downward spiral no end will take, suicide thoughts come.
Suicide is not a selfish act!

Not Like in the Movies

People with cancer can also have good times, even though the physical pain is present. I think some program for people with a
mental disorder would have the same effect. It would scare away all horror stories about the psychiatric department is a “mad house” and that people with furthering psychosis are crazy.

It is no secret that people who have never experienced or seen mentally ill people at close range only refer to what they have seen the movie or even imagined. All based on the little knowledge they have about what a mental disorder is.

And just this little knowledge people who do not have experienced mental illness is sitting inside with, is crucial to do something about. With increased knowledge comes understanding. And with understanding it will be easier to deal with the shame for the mentally ill, and openness will appear.

A Taboos’ Disease

The question is how to reach out with this knowledge.

A solution could be to have designated subjects in high school that was mandatory for all Mental Disorder Taboostudents where they taught young people about what a mental disorder is. Inform about why it occurs, how to help people who suffer and how one can help themselves and seek help if they should be hit by a mental disorder.

A depression is not a bad day. A depression is not whining over a couple of weeks.
Depression is a disease in the head. A disease in the same line as cancer and other diseases that are not equally taboo’s.
If one is in a state of depression, one loses oneself? It can feel as if life is completely meaningless. One can’t get out of bed. Curtains are pulled down. Darkness – a depressive person wants the darkness.

SSRIs – Not a Pill of “Happiness”

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

The balance in the brain is gone, and it is here the anti-depressive pills come into the picture – a means to restore balance in the brain. But it is not a “pill of happiness“.

Pills don`t make you happy automatically. Antidepressant does only half the job. The psychologist can do something, your friends and family also, but the rest is up to the depressed him or herself.

The depressed must have determination of another world and a false belief that everything is going to be OK. For the depressed it never feels like anything it’s ever going to be OK again. The depressed will get a different view of the world than before, and the pain feels like unbearable.

We Must Try to Understand Mental Disorder!

Mental Illness in Children

Mental Illness In Children – Are We Too Afraid To Find Out?

Up until about 20 years ago, the idea of mental illness occurring in children was pretty much unthinkable.

Boys who were extremely active were sent outside to play.  Defiant children were punished or sent outside to play.  Irritable children were sent outside to play.  Depressed children were sent outside to play.  Get the picture?Get the Idea

Today we do know a lot more about mental illness and have a lot more medication to treat it.  As mental illness becomes more easily diagnosed in adults, it is natural that we begin to look at our children and wonder.  It is also natural that we look back on our own childhoods and wonder or even know that we were ill then too.

Even though most psychiatric diseases are not diagnosed until the teens or early adulthood, it should be fairly obvious that those diseases did not suddenly happen when the kid turned 18. Likely there were signs of existing mental disorder long before the diagnosis.  Unfortunately, some parents may be too afraid to look.

The problem with recognizing mental illness in childhood is that symptoms of mental illness are different from the symptoms in adults.  Children’s symptoms can be masked with other signs or even opposite to those in adults, so they are not obvious. In addition, the symptoms of many different psychiatric disorders are so similar that it is difficult to distinguish one disorder from another.  Some examples:

Depression in children can show as: Depression, Insomnia, Nightmares, Bedwetting, Anxiety, Combativeness, Lack of interest, Anger, Poor grades

Anxiety in children can show as: Insomnia, Nightmares, Bedwetting, Fearfulness, Depression, Poor grades, Social inadequacies, Lack of interest, Combativeness, Anger.

Mental Illness in ChildrenADHD can show as: Inattentiveness, Lack of interest, Fidgetiness, Poor grades, Irritability, Inability to make friends, Excessive anger, Lack of organization

Asperger’s can show as: Lack of interest, Poor grades, Inability to make friends, Excessive anger, Lack of organization

On the other hand normal childhood occurrences such as puberty can show as: Lack of attention, Difficulty getting along with friends, Unexpected anger, Excessive sleep, Inability to sleep, Nightmares, Irritability, Mood swings, Excessive anger, Excessive crying, Poor grades

And Sexual abuse can show as: Nightmares, Bed-wetting, Excessive anger, Anxiety, Depression, Mood swings, Irritability, Disinterest

So how can we determine if it is something that happened to the child, something that is temporary or something like a mental illness?

The best things we can do are to pay attention, know your children.  If they change, find out why.  Know your family history.  If they seem “different”, talk to their teachers.  If they are continuously exhibiting behavior outside of the range of “normal”, there may be something wrong.  Listen to your kids, if they tell you that something is wrong, it probably is.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Educate yourself.  Take the self-test quizzes.  Have your spouse or the child’s other caregivers take the tests.  Take all of this information to your healthcare provider and if that doesn’t work, find someone who will listen.

Most mental disorders are not diagnosed until the late teens or early adulthood – bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorder and schizophrenia.  There is more recognition today, but a lot of resistances to – both from parents and health professionals.  Don’t be afraid to seek help just because you are afraid of medication, knowing what is wrong and knowing your options can head off problems.

Recognizing an oncoming issue may help prevent years of anguish for your child and yourself.

Melissa Lind

Abandonment and Borderline Personality Disorder

Physically and emotional sides of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

Well, kids.  It happened.  I pushed too hard, wanted too much, and was too needy.  And now the woman that I love more than anyone I’ve ever met, the woman who still wanted to be my friend, has vowed to never speak to me again… for my own good.

Physically and emotional ides about Borderline Personality DisorderHer therapist said that even continuing to speak with me was “cruel,” as I was still trying to get our relationship back and “would never stop.”  And her therapist was right.  And I’m still not stopping, but neither am I speaking.  I’m giving her the space I should have given her almost two months ago.

As of this writing, it’s been five days since I’ve had any communication with “Justine.”  My therapist said it would benefit me to “become fascinated” with the feeling and really analyze it.  That way, I’m not just passively feeling things, but getting my brain involved, too.  So here goes.

Physically, not talking to her feels like:

1.  An itch that is unscratchable.  An itch on the inside of my skin.  Mostly in my arms and chest.

2.  A python wrapped around my chest and slowly squeezing the breath from me.  Taking deep breaths results in my lungs “shuddering.”

3.  My guts are trying to digest themselves.  Everything inside of me squishes and sloshes like I’m nothing more than a thin plastic coating around a cold liquid.

4.  An icepick buried into my heart.  Not metaphorically speaking, but literally.  During the worst of it, I feel like I’ve been stabbed about eleven times.  The only thing that’s missing is the mess.

5.  Partial paralysis.  My hands and feet are so heavy I have to drag them wherever I go.

6.  Chugging about a dozen energy drinks.  I shake.  I twitch.  And I most certainly can’t sleep.

Now let’s examine the emotional side of things.  Emotionally, not talking to her feels like:

1.  Living death—I breathe.  I eat (a little). I wake up in the morning.  But why?  What’s the point of it all?

2.  Happiness is gone forever—I’ve had some good moments these last few days.  For example, I just got the coolest new apartment ever in the coolest town ever.  The first person I want to tell is Justine.  But I can’t tell Justine.  So there goes that happiness.  Also, I just got my script back from the director.  With a little polish from me, it’s going to five different producers, and I mean BIG producers, so my little movie that was originally written to be shot for around fifty thousand MIGHT get a budget between 10 and 20 million.  Guess who I want to tell about that?  Guess who I can’t.  So again… what’s the point of it all?  Money really CAN’T buy happiness.

3.  No matter how bad it is, it will continue to get worse—once I’m back in the day to day grind without all of these amazing things happening, I won’t even get my little bursts of happiness.  So again… what’s the damned point?

And that’s where I am now, oh my brothers and sisters in arms.  Now that she’s gone, what is the point?

The point is that time heals all wounds.  Today was a little better than yesterday, which was a little better than the day before, which was infinitely better than last Wednesday when I said my final goodbye to her.

But I have to wonder if it is indeed final.  Is it REALLY forever, or just forever for now?

I believe I suffer from a much worse disease than Borderline Personality Disorder, my friends.  I suffer from one of the worst diseases of them all.

I suffer from Hope.

Your brother in arms,

-Bruce

Read more from Bruce Anderson here: How I Became the Freak in the Corner

(A page that tells his story from the beginning and has links to several of his articles – Starting with bipolarity and ending with borderline personality disorder)

Abandonment and Borderline Personality Disorder: How it Feels

Taking Teenage Depression Seriously

Dealing with Teenage Depression

serious young girlDepression is widespread. International studies have flagged it as one of the most devastating diseases on the face of the planet. Although no one is immune to the ravages of depression, certain demographics are more likely to suffer from the illness than others. Such a vulnerable group is the teenaged population. Statistics illustrate that incidences of depression are disproportionately common among young people and too often are accompanied by serious consequences.

Teenage depression is too often (and too easily) dismissed in many cases as being nothing more than an emotional “growing pain.” It is true that the changing nature of the body`s hormonal makeup, combined with encountering new dimensions and responsibilities in one`s life can induce some depressive symptoms in teenagers who are, in reality, perfectly healthy. However, that is not always the case, and any potential case of teenage depression must be taken extremely seriously.

Not every child who is in a down mood has a bona fide case of teenage depression, of course. The demands and social pressures placed upon teens can cause down moods in perfectly normal children. Children who experience these down periods for more than a few weeks at a time, or display other common symptoms of depression should be carefully evaluated in case a mere physical mental health problem does occur.

Changes in appetite, alterations in sleep habits, increased anxiety or irritability can be a host of other potential warning flags. If one is demonstrating sadness or despair, it might be a sign of teenage depression and must be checked. One should also check for other readily available diagnostic aids and lists of depressive symptoms for further guidance.

The consequences of overlooking the disorder are essential. Initially, the condition does deny individuals of a potentially high quality of life during a crucial developmental stage. Additionally, younger people have not yet necessarily developed the kinds of coping mechanisms and wider perspectives adults can use when dealing with depression. This lack of coping tools is one reason why teenage depression tends to result in a greater propensity for suicide than does its adult counterpart.

Kids will be kids, and part of being a growing kid is moodiness. Sometimes, that moodiness will manifest itself as a simple case of the “blues.” Fortunately, even more severe situations of this nature often tend to pass in a few weeks as the situations spurring them fade into memory. However, when the episodes seem even slightly emotional or last longer than two weeks, a serious case of teenage depression may be present.

If there is any possibility that your teenager is depressed, consult with a medical professional as soon as possible. The potential consequences of this mental health problem are sufficiently severe to justify and heightened level of concern and a willingness to err on the side of caution. It might be nothing, but it might be teenage depression.

A helpful recourse? Helping Your Depressed Teenager: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers

Helping Your Depressed Teenager

Description:

“The authors have produced a very readable, extremely well informed and comprehensive book that will add greatly to the knowledge base of interested parents. This book is strongly recommended.” –Stewart Gable, MD Chairman, Department of Psychiatry The Children’s Hospital, Denver, Colorado You supported and encouraged them as they grew from toddlers to teens.

Now you are confronted with one of the toughest challenges you and they will ever face – teenage depression.

Adolescence is a period of peaks and valleys. Most teens negotiate these years with relative ease; yet for some these times are treacherous with countless pitfalls. When depression ensues, it can interfere with much of your child’s potential. Clinical depression is now epidemic among American teens, and teen suicide can be a deadly consequence. Helping Your Depressed Teenager is a practical guide offering family solutions to a family problem. This book will sensitize you to the hidden struggles of adolescents and assist you in understanding their multifaceted problems.

The authors are experts in this field and have helped countless youngsters confront and overcome their depressed mood. In a highly readable and gentle manner, they help you see behind the “masks” of troubled teens who attempt to hide their true feelings. They help you distinguish the subtle and sometimes not so subtle signs that something is seriously wrong. And they help you provide the loving support and assistance teenagers need to make it through this difficult life passage. Some of the useful information provided:
* What families can do to prevent teen depression
* How to tell the difference between moodiness and depression
* How to read the warning signs of a troubled teenager
* How to know when professional help is needed and where to find it
* How to choose the right treatment options for your teen

Bipolar Disorder and Social Media

Use Bipolar Chat as a Means of Support?

Bipolar disorder chatting online is currently the preferred option for the growing support for people suffering from bipolar disorder (sometimes known as manic depression).Bipolar Online Chat

While bipolar chat option will not replace an appropriate treatment option recommended, everyone can provide some benefits for other bipolar people.

As the Internet has grown, the opportunity to interact with similar interests and conditions has increased.

Although we often assume that the social possibilities in terms of the fans to discuss their passions or professional exchange of ideas, it will also result in the creation of discussion groups and chat rooms for those suffering from certain diseases. The bipolar chat is an example of this phenomenon.

Despite a certain level of social development, mental illness still carries a stigma. Also, just based on symptoms, mental health problems can make people feel marginalized, and can stimulate ineffective separation. In discussing these issues with others in a supportive environment, some of the negative consequences can be minimized.

When there is someone to talk with, bipolar chat can allow victims of depression to feel less alone with their problem. It can help them realize that their struggle with the burden of this disease is not unique to them. This can reduce the feeling of being “out” and can give positive reinforcement as one continue to deal with the condition.

In some situations, bipolar chat may be one of the only real ways in how people can appraise significantly, and interact with other people who suffers from the illness. Those in rural areas or small towns cannot always have a “face to face” is an option, and then online bipolar chat can be extremely useful.

Others may feel uncomfortable with the “face” the situation and still be able to get some therapeutic value of bipolar disorder chat.

Although the online chat option can help, should not replace professional advice or therapy sessions prescribed. The support offered by a group chat can be brilliant but will allow coping skills, and information offered by the program receives professional treatment.

Nevertheless; we should not eliminate the need for bipolar chat medical use of drugs.

We must recognize that bipolar disorder is a hugely serious medical problem that requires * professional medical assistance. * Self-help in the form of a bipolar chat or other possibilities should be done only with the approval of a physician. In some cases, doctors may recommend that a person not involved in the effort and patients should pay attention to medical advice.

Advances in technology led to the creation of a valuable resource for those suffering from mental illness. An opportunity to share and learn from others with a similar analysis can be reassuring and helpful, which is the main reason for the growth of online opportunities such as bipolar disorder chat.

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* professional medical assistance*

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