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episodes of depression

Clinical Depression vs. Situational Depression

Clinical depression is a serious health problem that warrants immediate professional intervention.

Depression is one of the world’s most frequently encountered maladies, and recent United Nations World Health Organization research indicates that the problem will continue to increase and will soon be the second most dangerous global medical problem, following only heart disease.

Not allbipolar banner depression is the same, however. A passing sense of sadness is normal for all of us. Depression exists when normal emotions are experienced without sufficient motivation, or if that sadness remain after it should have passed. Clinical depression is the most severe form of the problem. Others suffer from situational depression or chronic low-grade depression (dysthymia). All incidences of depression deserve careful attention, but those experiencing clinical depression should seek treatment immediately from a qualified physician.

Situational depression is fetched from some specific event in life, and normally it will dissipate within a few weeks. Although it may share many of the same features of clinical depression such as agitation, nervousness, changes in appetite or sleeping habits, it is not as severe or long-lasting.

One may be experiencing clinical depression when their “down mood” lasts for over two weeks. Those suffering from the illness are virtually unable to enjoy any part of their life. Suicidal ideation and a sense of complete hopelessness are common.

Clinical instances of depression do not necessarily require any specific trigger. However, events in a person’s life can precipitate the onset of the condition. This indicates that episodes of depression which can seemingly be easily linked to a specific happening, should not be automatically presumed to be situational in nature.

Whereas, situational depression may disappear as the sufferer finds ways to cope with the problem`s triggers. Clinically depressed individuals require professional assistance to deal with the condition. Frequently, antidepressant medications and/or therapeutic solutions are prescribed for the treatment of clinical depression. Those who fail to seek out help for their depression may experience an escalation in the severity of symptoms. This will certainly undermine one`s quality of life, and that can even be fatal.

All forms of depression adversely impact the quality of life for sufferers and should be taken seriously. However, clinical episodes of depression are of such tremendous potential severity that one must take action to stave off a worsening of the situation.

If you or someone you know is experiencing common symptoms associated with depression and has been in that rut for more than a few weeks, medical intervention should be immediately sought. The age-old stigma regarding mental illness in our society should not be an excuse to avoid seeking treatment. Not only are those biases beginning to disappear as the extent of the depression epidemic becomes more widely known, the stakes are simply too high to justify such behavior.

The condition can be successfully treated. Thousands of people recover from illness and go on to live happy, well-adjusted lives, after dealing with clinical depression.

This might be a helpful resource for someone: When Going Through Hell… Don’t Stop! A Survivor’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety and Clinical Depression

clinical depression

Description:

In this groundbreaking book, self-help author Douglas Bloch shares his struggle with and ultimate recovery from a life-threatening depressive illness. Although the managed care mental health system failed to provide him with adequate treatment, Mr. Bloch devised a daily survival plan for living in hell which he adopted until the power of spirit, acting through a group of committed, loving people, brought about his recovery.

In addition to his compelling story, Mr. Bloch outlines a fourteen point brain maintenance program holistic approach to the treatment of anxiety and depression that includes: diet; nutrition; exercise; stress-reduction; medication; vitamin, mineral and herbal supplements; and the importance of creating strong bonds of social support (social isolation is both a cause and consequence of depression).

The book also includes a comprehensive 130 page self-help section on treating depression, including a 10 page listing of Internet sites for on-line healing assistance.

Moreover, the narrative is complemented by paintings from history’s great artists that visually depict the various states of mind that the author experienced. In receiving words and images that stimulate both sides of the brain, the reader is given a complete picture of the journey from depression to recovery.

What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

So, what causes Bipolar disorder?

It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers, that causes Bipolar disorder…

Bipolar doctor

Manic depression, also called bipolar disorder, causes severe mood swings that can last for weeks or even months.

Everyone feels happy or sad sometimes. For someone with manic depression, however, these mood swings are much more intense. Scientists have not identified a single factor what causes bipolar disorder. Instead, it may have one or more of several different causes. These may be broken down into genetic, environmental and physiological causes.

There are three types of manic depression.

Bipolar Type I is characterized by at least one manic episode. A manic episode is a feeling of intense elation, restlessness and loss of inhibitions and over-activity. Sufferers during a manic episode may sleep for only three or four hours a night if at all.

Bipolar Type II, where there may be frequent episodes of depression with only mild manic episodes (called hypomania). Rapid cycling involves four or more mood swings over the period of a year.

Finally, there is Cyclothymia, where the mood swings last longer but they are less severe.

Genes is considered to be a contributing factor.

If one of your relatives has manic depression, there is a reasonable chance that you will develop it, too. Chromosome numbers 6 and 8 appear to have been implicated. Children of bipolar parents have an eight percent chance of developing the condition, compared with one percent in the general population.

A chemical imbalance in the brain may cause the disorder. Nerve signals travel from one neuron to another by way of chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. It is possible that excess levels of norepinephrine may cause a manic episode.

During a depressive episode, levels of this neurotransmitter may be excessively low. The picture, however, is not that simple, as there are other neurotransmitters involved.

Mood swings can also be triggered by stress. Abuse; either physical, emotional or sexual, may trigger an episode. Bereavement or the breakdown of a close relationship may also be a trigger.

Not all stressful triggers are negative experiences. A positive change, such as a marriage or a birth can also make a contribution.

Once diagnosed, the condition can be treated or controlled, although certain risk factors may trigger a recurrence. Failure to comply with medication carries a high risk of recurrence, as do alcohol or drug abuse. Other risk factors include poor support systems. For example, the lack of caring friends or relatives or an erratic lifestyle.

Manic depression can lead to psychosocial disturbances.

For example, Bipolar Type I and Bipolar Type II are associated with a high absentee rate at work. There is also a higher rate of suicide attempts and hospital admissions with these conditions. While both conditions have high rates of attempted suicides, Type II sufferers seem to have fewer hospital admissions than Type I, and consequently miss fewer days at work.

So, what causes bipolar disorder? It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers.

Complying with medication, adopting a stable lifestyle, and developing healthy coping strategies, may all keep the condition under control.

It is essential to consult a medical professional and not attempt self diagnosis.