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Anxiety – When to Seek Help

When should one seek for help if anxiety occur?

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Some measure of anxiety is normal, and no treatment is necessary. However, there does come a point at
which seeking treatment for anxiety is vital to your well-being. Essentially, there are three instances where treatment should be sought.

The first is if you experience a panic attack. For people who have never experienced a panic attack, they may mistakenly think that they are suffering from a heart attack, and they will usually seek emergency treatment for that. Doctors perform tests to determine if a heart attack has occurred, and if it has not, based on the symptoms that occurred, a panic attack may be diagnosed.

When your anxiety has escalated to this point, you do need treatment for anxiety. The treatment that you receive from emergency medical professionals, thinking that you had a heart attack, is not sufficient treatment for anxiety.

Anxiety - by Telise RodelvIf your anxiety is unusual and extended, you should seek treatment. You know what a normal amount of stress is for you, but feeling anxious for a prolonged period or feeling an unexpected increase in the feelings of anxiety usually indicates that treatment is needed.

If the anxiety starts interfering in your life, treatment is required. Anxiety could keep one from doing things in life that they might do otherwise if that anxiety did not exist. For example, someone who is developing social anxiety may stop going to events or functions as frequently as they used to, and this does interfere in their life.

There is a fourth reason to seek treatment. Sometimes, we are too close to ourselves to see the big picture. If you have a fear or anxiety that you feel is perfectly normal, and someone close to you says it is not, it doesn’t hurt to seek the advice of a trained professional.

That other person may be wrong, and your fear or anxiety may be perfectly normal — but you do need to be sure.

Related article on Huffington Post – I Hate Being Bipolar – It’s Awesome!

Stress All around You

Some of the first signs of stress in your life are health related

Stress, known as “the silent killer”, and it definitely creeps up on you without warning. So how do you know if you have too much stress in your life?

Anxiety and HeadacheStress can affect your body; your muscles start to ache for no reason, and you suffer from headaches. Your mental focus is altered, as well. Your concentration levels drop and your interest in certain things disappear. Plus your overall enjoyment of life decreases.

It is crucial to be aware of these symptoms, and to take action. Stress is just the first step on a road that potentially could lead to things like suffering from a heart attack, or having to deal with anxiety or depression.

The problem is that stress is everywhere. You have to deal with everyday stress in your life. This includes the normal running around of preparing for work each day, getting your kids off to school and taking care of your home. All before you have even had a chance to do something nice for yourself!

At work you are pressured to get your job done on time, you may be asked to work extra hours, or take on additional tasks when someone is sick or on vacation. You oblige as you don’t want to be a whiner, but all this does is increase your stress levels.

It is vital that you learn how to say no. You want to make an effort to get some ‘me time’. Take 30 minutes a day where you do nothing but focus on yourself! Without that, you could be on the road to health issues, both mental and physical.

On top of this, anxiety jumps out at you from the television, on the internet and even in newspapers. You have read about tragic events that can be upsetting. You may feel pressured into needing to buy a better car, or to get the newest Smartphone that just was released.

When you think about all of these things, no wonder you feel as though you are living in a whirlwind. Start today and make a point of finding some small way of spending just a few minutes on you!
Unplug, unwind and relax.

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Suffering from anxiety disorder and have panic attacks?

Do you have anxiety?
Are you constantly worried?

We all probably know that anxiety is a normal part of life.  That horrible feeling of anxiousness is something that can happen to all of us from time to time — and with good reason. However, many people suffer from anxiety without any valid reason — regardless of how correct the reason for the anxiety seems to them.

Anxiety can cause a host of other mental health problems.
Child AnxietyFirst, when the brain is stressed, the body’s immune system fails to function properly. Things like this leads to illnesses. Second, anxiety can prevent one from living life to the fullest. And, finally, stress can lead to full-blown anxiety attacks, otherwise known as panic attacks.

A panic attack might feel like a heart attack. In fact, when one suffers their first panic attack, this is what they think that it is, in most cases. They will usually seek out medical emergency services. A lot of the symptoms are often the same as a heart attack. The person may feel chest pains, have trouble catching their breath, become dizzy, feel nauseous, and also feel completely out of control.

AnxiousLuckily, you won’t die from a panic attack — even though you can’t be convinced of that when it is happening. Even better news is that panic attacks can be prevented. Medication can be prescribed, relaxation techniques can be used, and counseling, in the form of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) can be sought.

Your doctor will most likely prescribe an antidepressant for your anxiety. However, antidepressants take about three weeks to become effective, and during this time, you may discover that you are more anxious than you were before. Panic attacks may become more severe during this time.

For reasons mentioned, your doctor may also prescribe a benzodiazepine. The benzodiazepine will effectively take care of the anxious feelings, and help to prevent panic attacks. However, this is not a safe long-term drug, as antidepressants are. Therefore, after about three weeks, your doctor will most likely discontinue the benzodiazepine, and continue with the antidepressant. Naturally, CBT will also be recommended.

Panic attacks are very real — and very scary. If you suffer from panic attacks, know that there is treatment out there, and with that treatment, you can avoid future panic attacks.

Stress and Anxiety – Is There Any Relationship? (Free PDF)

Panic attacks and anxiety disorder sufferers

The Anxiety Attack

Anxiety attacks come quite quickly, with little or no warning.

What is the physical aspects of an anxiety attack, you may ask?

An anxiety attack, which is also referred to as a panic attack, is not the same thing as “feeling anxious.” We all feel anxious from time to time, and many people even feel anxious all of the time — because they suffer from an anxiety disorder. However, anxiety attack — which is, of course, brought on by extreme anxiety — is just a side effect of anxiety.

Anxiety AttackAn anxiety attack comes on fairly fast, with little or no warning. They last as long as 10 minutes, but the average attack lasts between one and five minutes. After one has suffered one or several anxiety attacks, they accept it for what it is. First-time sufferers often think that they have a heart attack, or even a nervous breakdown. They may even think that they are dying — even though they aren’t.

While many people may think that anxiety attacks are brought on by mental issues, this isn’t quite true. We all have a fight or flight response. Sometimes, when one suffers from anxiety disorders, the fight or flight response goes into “overdrive.” This causes the body to be flooded with hormones, including adrenalin, which causes the other symptoms of a panic attack.

An anxiety attack can be quite overwhelming and scary. Several things occur at once — physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Physically, people may start profusely sweating. They may become short of breath, have a pounding heart, experience chest pain, become dizzy and/or lightheaded, feel nauseous, and even hyperventilate. They may feel as they are being choked or smothered, and there are numerous other physical aspects of an anxiety attack.

Mentally, the person will feel complete out of control, experience as they are going crazy, may hear things louder than they actually are have racing thoughts, and have impaired vision. They may seem like life has either slowed down or sped up. They may feel as they are in a dream (or nightmare) state. Tunnel vision is also common during a panic attack.

Emotionally, they will feel terror. They may fear that they are dying, and they may experience flashbacks to either earlier anxiety attacks or other traumatic events in their lives.

As you can see, anxiety attack is no joking matter for the person experiencing it. Luckily, there are medications that can be prescribed to minimize the appearance of panic attacks, as well as the symptoms experienced during such attacks.

Complications Associated with Depression Treatment

These days, the medications used to treat depression are actually remarkably good.

Not only are they effective, but they have proven to be safe, and are even no addictive. Most people have little or no side effects from the medication at all, and if they do experience mild side effects, those effects usually pass rather quickly.

The complications associated with depression treatment don’t actually pertain to the medication used at all — but there are some complications indeed. You see, usually when people experience major depression there is an exceedingly legitimate chance that depression will reoccur later.

Depression Treatment - ComplicationsIn fact, research shows that of everyone who seeks treatment for depression and are able to get past the depression and discontinue the medication — with the approval of their doctor — one-third of those people will experience depression again, often within a year. Furthermore, of those people, approximately half will experience depression again within their lifetime.

Depression also has other effects. There is, of course, a 15% chance of suicide. People who suffer from depression, typically are not as healthy as those who do not, from a physical standpoint. Furthermore, those who suffer from depression are less likely to live through a heart attack or stroke.

This does not mean that you are doomed if you suffer from depression. It is crucial to seek treatment and work closely with your doctor. Counseling should be sought, and should continue even after the depressive episode has passed. Your doctor will work with you, to adjust medication appropriately — and to discontinue the medication when it is not needed. He or she will also help you to be more aware of depression as it starts creeping in.

Studies have shown that the earlier the depression is treated, the sooner it is likely to pass. Therefore, it is vital that you and your doctor stay up to date with your mental and physical state.

Also read; What is the Symptoms of Depression

What Are the Symptoms of Anxiety?

Recognizing anxiety is fairly easy.

We all feel anxious from time to time throughout our lives. That anxiety is usually short term – lasting a day or less – or mid-term – lasting several days or weeks during a normally stressful period. Anxiety is a normal thing in life. It is part of our “fight or flight” response system, and when a situation occurs that stresses us, we feel anxious.

But anxiety is not always normal. You may feel anxious and discover that there is actually nothing to be anxious about in your life at the moment. If this is a problem that persists, you may be suffering from an anxiety disorder.  If your anxiety is constant, to the point where it is consuming your life – it is a problem. This type of anxiety could even cause you to fear certain situations, which in turn causes you to isolate yourself.

Note that feeling anxious and having an anxiety or panic attack is in fact, two different things. If you feel anxious, you may be worried or even feel fearful.

However, when you are having an anxiety attack, there are physical symptoms that you will have along with it, such as:

1.  Being short of breath
2.  Chest pain
3.  Shaking or trembling
4.  Pounding heart or palpitations
5.  Dizziness
6.  Nausea
7.  Hot or cold flashes

Bipolar - Mental Health

Along with worry and fear, if you feel these symptoms, you may think that you have a heart attack. You may even fear that you are going to die. While all of this is terribly scary, and treatment should be sought, the good news is that nobody has ever died from an anxiety attack. People do, however, die of a heart attack, which has similar symptoms, mistakenly thinking it is a panic attack.

The best thing to do, if you are feeling anxious, is to seek treatment for the anxiety before you suffer an anxiety attack. Treatment for anxiety is twofold – treating the mental state as well as treating the physical state.