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Face of Borderline Personality Disorder

Pro Football Player Brandon Marshall Wants to be the “face” of Borderline Personality Disorder

Brandon Marshall - The Face of Borderline Personality DisorderIf you don’t follow professional sports in the U.S., you may not know who Brandon Marshall is. He is an NFL Wide Receiver, recently acquired by the New York Jets. His long history of violent outbursts, brushes with law enforcement and behavioral issues that have affected both his personal and professional life.

Marshall had played professional football since 2006 when the Denver Broncos drafted him. He has since played for the Miami Dolphins, the Chicago Bears and was recently acquired by the New York Jets. The Wide Receiver played in five Pro-Bowls, receiving an MVP award in 2011 and has set several receiving records during his NFL career.

Brandon Marshall - BPDThough he has played for four different teams in only nine years, most of the trades have come after a series of injuries. Not all of those injuries, however, have come from football and Marshall has a long history of legal trouble, and those issues have affected various team’s willingness to put up with his erratic behavior.

One notable injury was sustained in 2008 when he slipped on an empty bag in McDonalds. While this seems like a complete accident, the incident occurred during a physical scuffle with “family members”. Shortly after the event, he fell through a television set at his home, causing a severe arm injury.

Marshall has faced multiple fines with the NFL including two penalties for violating the team’s dress code by wearing brightly colored cleats during a game. The list of legal troubles he has had include drunk driving charges, domestic violence, assault, battery and disorderly conduct. Marshall was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder in 2011.

Borderline Personality Disorder is not a well-known disorder and is highly stigmatized, with many people unwilling to disclose the condition. It is characterized by severe abandonment issues, risky behavior, personal identity issues, rapid changes in an Borderline Personality Disorder - Brandon Marshallemotional level, and high potential for self-harm. Treatment is largely comprised of behavioral therapy. However, some patients receive medication for other psychiatric disorders that may improve BPD symptoms. There is also some thought that medication treatment may be useful in Borderline Personality Disorder. However, no drugs are approved to treat the condition.

Marshall’s diagnosis of BPD likely comes as no surprise to those who understand the disorder. His willingness to come forward and publicly announce his condition may help others to understand BPD. He has been and is currently undergoing treatment and is in the process of filming a documentary about his battle with BPD. Marshall has stated that his goal is to be the “face” of Borderline Personality Disorder to bring public awareness for those who struggle with the condition.

Though he has been forthright, many in the sports world had stated that the New York Jets will have their hands full when he joins the team as his troubles have decreased only slightly since he began treatment.

Melissa Lind

Is it Antisocial Personality Disorder?

Some teenagers act as if they have antisocial personality disorder

I once knew a family with a son who was diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder.  The “kid” had grown up in a wealthy subdivision with a father who was a former professional athlete.  The “kid” had everything that most “kids” would want.  In high school, he had a brand new car that he immediately totaled after a party.  He was in trouble with the law several times during high school.

When his father tried to put his foot down, his mother took the “kid’s” side.  She thought he would grow out of it.  Others said that his behavior was the result of “privilege”, which certainly didn’t help, but it is clear that not every wealthy kid is a spoiled brat – and a dangerous one at that.

Antisocial Personality DisorderRather than using his position and financial ability to go to college and earn a degree, he started doing drugs and got kicked out.  He was sent to a famous rehabilitation center where as soon as he “dried out”, he beat up a staff member and was thrown out.  He went home and beat up his girlfriend, but his mother hired the most expensive lawyer available, and he was given probation.  He was arrested with a sizeable amount of drugs – and again was bailed out by his mother.

This went on for a number of years – but the teenage behavior never stopped.  He finally exhausted the judge’s leniency and ended up in a state penitentiary.  Each time, he blamed his behavior on someone else.  He wouldn’t have gotten drunk if he hadn’t been so mad, he wouldn’t have beaten his girlfriend if she had just done what he said… and on and on.  This “kid” was 35 by the time he went to prison, but he never understood what he had done wrong.  It was still someone else’s fault.

When someone is disagreeable, people will often say “He is anti-social.”  What they are referring to is an actual psychiatric diagnosis, Antisocial Personality Disorder, but just because someone is disagreeable or even downright rude doesn’t mean they have the condition.

A personality disorder is a pervasive pattern of behavior that is not “acceptable” by cultural standards.  It is readily seen as abnormal behavior and usually starts in adolescence or early adulthood.  In order to qualify as a “disorder”, it must lead to personal distress or impairment.

Antisocial personality disorder cannot be diagnosed until the age of 18 because many of the “symptoms” seem like typical teenage behavior.  It is characterized by disregarding and violating the rights of other people.  Many teenagers act as if they have antisocial personality disorder – but they don’t.  In addition, in order to be labeled as “antisocial“, there must have been some conduct disorder symptoms before age 15 – or the time kids are often worst as teenagers.

Ashamed of Mental Health StigmasThings that kids do or say during the teen years, don’t count.

A person with antisocial personality disorder has a general disdain for the rights of other people and may violate those rights on a routine basis.  They may be charming, but ruthless and are likely to be irresponsible, irritable, and aggressive.  They are also likely to be in legal trouble and likely to abuse drugs or alcohol.

Antisocial Personality disorder also comes in a range of severity.  A person with mild antisocial personality disorder could be compared to a teenager who continuously borrows her mother’s jewelry when she has been told not to.  This would not be completely out of the norm in some teen girls, but in adults, it may indicate pathology.

People with more dangerous or harmful behavior are referred to as sociopaths or even psychopathsSociopaths have even less regard for someone else’s rights or property and may not even feel the need to argue if confronted – acting like a schoolyard bully.  Psychopaths are said to have a complete lack of conscience and are unable to recognize the violation and do not have the ability to empathize – something like “The Joker” in Batman.

People with antisocial behavior patterns are also extremely manipulative and splendid liars.  It is hard to tell what is true and what is not true.  They may appear to be friendly when they want something, or they may attempt suicide when they want something else.  It is a fine line to walk, whether to believe them or not.

Unfortunately, personality disorders are not something that can be changed through medication.  In this case, it is a failure of conscience, and there is no pill for that.  In some cases, therapy can work but the therapist must be very skilled in order to avoid being manipulated themselves.

Melissa Lind