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manic depression

Bipolar Disorder and Facebook – To Tell or Not to Tell

To Tell or Not to Tell – Bipolar Disorder on social media

I am an avid Facebook user.  Mostly I use it to amuse myself, keep up with old friends, get to know people who should be old friends but weren’t, update family on my kids and such… But, I also enjoy reading “pages” … pages about funny things and pages about serious things that only “we” understand are funny.  I am talking about bipolar” pages.

Facebook - Like PagesBecause Facebook lists updates of what pages you have “liked”, my relatives, who know I am bipolar, have been able to see that I am not keeping my disorder as a big secret from my social group.  Most everyone who is on my Facebook page already knows (or would guess) that I have bipolar disorder.  To them, it is not a big deal, it is just part of who I am, and in some ways actually explains part of who I am – manic-depressive, why I am the way that I am.

I bring this up because one of my “relatives” actually sent me an email “warning” me that I should “be careful” about what pages I frequent, referring to the bipolar pages.

That was one bit of unwelcome advice.  Another bit of advice might be to “unfriend” him or hide my activity from him.  I am NOT Bipolar - I have Bipolar DisorderHe is a close relative so “unfriending” him might cause problems.  I could hide my activity but have made a personal policy that if you are my “friend” then you can see my page.  I haven’t taken advantage of the “close friends”, “friends”, “acquaintances” – feature of Facebook – but then I don’t let anyone on my page unless they are actually someone I know.

The last bit of advice would be to ignore him.  Luckily, he is such a close relative that I have made a practice of ignoring his advice, as a child would ignore a parent.  I did just that – ignore him.

This situation was easy for me to solve under these particular circumstances but can be a lot of trickier.  I also belong to bipolar pages on LinkedIn, Google+ and other sites, and I sometimes wonder about the impact.  Fortunately, I happen to be a writer, and I am not in a situation where an employer (or potential employer) can make an objection to my diagnosis.

For others that are not the case – and it was not always the case for me.  There is still a huge stigma against bipolar disorder.  Technically, making an employment decision based on a mental diagnosis is illegal – it is against the ADA.

Technically, the employer could be in trouble for violation of federal law, but how many times do employers say outright” “I am not hiring you because…(insert problem here)”?  Likely they will not say anything – they just won’t hire you.  In some states, they can fire you for no reason (“at-will” employment states) or “not-for-cause”.

Technically, they should not hold this against you – if you are stable, and if you remain stable.  The question is – will you?  Hopefully, I will, but I can’t guarantee that.

Bipolar BearsIf I were looking for a job – a “real” job, I would seriously consider curtailing my social media and public announcements of “I am bipolar“.  As a writer – I shouldn’t do that, and I don’t.

You have to evaluate your particular situation.  Know that it is against the law to be discriminated against.  Know your history and likelihood that you will remain stable in your bipolar disorder and be able to do your job.  Decide whether a legal fight is worth it to you.  It may be; it might not be.  Decide whether you really want to work for someone who will hunt you down and discriminate against you based on the information they find.

For me, I am happy not being in a “real job “.  The same relative, full of warnings, is not happy about my lack of “real” employment – but I can just ignore him.  Either way, I am still Bipolar.

Melissa Lind

Bipolar II – Really?

Is it Bipolar II – or just plain Bipolar Disorder not yet recognized?

Google “Bipolar” on the “news” tab and see what you find.  It is astounding how many semi-celebrities have come out and said “I have Bipolar Disorder”.  Unfortunately, the story is often about Bipolar II, which somehow makes it “better”.

Bipolar Disorder is still a serious stigma – prevents people from getting jobs and such.  Technically, as Bipolar Disorder is considered a disability, an employer who did not hire or fired an admitted bipolar patient based only on that fact would be in violation of the American Disabilities Act, but few people are willing to go to the carpet on that.  Plus there is the little issue of being “able” to perform one’s job.  I can perform a job if I am taking meds.  If I am off of meds, I become highly unreliable with a lot of other liabilities – risky behavior that I have decided not to discuss.

Only a couple of years ago, I was warned by a well-meaning family member against posting too much on social media about Bipolar Disorder – and this in his mind included “liking” too many Bipolar pages.  He was concerned about my ability to obtain a decent job.  I don’t know if I have a “decent “job today – I have made my own way which works out better for me – no boss to annoy, no dress code, nobody else’s time clock.  For the most part, I don’t worry about social media – I don’t think I will ever have a “real” job again – no more frequent flyer miles for me.

Bipolar 2I was once diagnosed as Bipolar II – but really, both the doctor and the therapist thought differently – they both knew that I had regular Bipolar Disorder but wasn’t ready to accept it.  Actually, I am pretty sure my doctor tricked me into taking Lithium for the first time by telling me that it would help boost my antidepressant activity.

In retrospect, I am astounded that I believed him since I know so much about medication – but I took the medication.  How many of these people really have Bipolar I Disorder and just don’t say so.

It is much easier for people to say and accept that they have Bipolar II.  In my opinion (which is obviously vast and knowledgeable – just kidding, no really), Bipolar II is a way of sliding by the real diagnosis.  As in “I have Bipolar Disorder but not really”.  “I have Bipolar Disorder but I am not crazy”.  “I have Bipolar Disorder but I am not dangerous”.  “I have Bipolar Disorder but I won’t embarrass you”.
When it gets down to it…wasn’t that true for all of us at one time?  Or at least didn’t we believe it at one time?  I still fit some of the criteria – I am “functional”, “productive”, “hypomanic” – except when I am not.

I often confuse my doctor when he asks how it is going by saying “good enough”.  What I mean is that I am not manic exactly, I am not depressed.  Actually it works better for me if I am teetering on the edge of mania.  If I am just crazy enough that I know that I am crazy – then I will keep taking my meds.  Because I forget.

I originally sought treatment for severe depressiondepression bad enough that I had to decide whether to kill myself or study (I had a big exam the next day).  In retrospect, I was actually in a mixed episode with plenty of energy but in a really bad mood.  Oh, and then there was the slight issue of the hypnogogic hallucinations which I denied at the time.  See, even if I know that I have Bipolar DisorderManic Depression – I still forget.

It would be easier for me to say that I have Bipolar Disorder but it is “just” Bipolar II.  I thought that too.

Melissa

Bipolar Disorder – Euphoria vs. Dysphoria or Mixed Episode

Most symptoms of Manic Episodes appear to be positive

Manic-depression or Bipolar disorder is usually perceived on of two ways – a person who alternates between depression and euphoria – or a person who alternates between depression and craziness.

Often a person who is told that they are bipolar will identify one of those two states – and will object based on the fact that they have never been “euphoric“, and they have never been actually psychotic or “crazy”.

Bipolar disorder or Manic-Depression is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) – “the Bible” of psychiatric disorders – as “…clinical course that is characterized by the occurrence of one or more Manic Episodes…”

7 “points” retrieved from: DSM IV Criteria for Manic Episode – Food and Drug Administration

A distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood, lasting at least one week. With three or more of:

1. Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
2. Decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only three hours of sleep)
3. More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking
4. Flight of ideas, or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
5. Distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli)
6. Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school or sexually) or psychomotor agitation
7. Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)

There is another specifier – “The symptoms do not meet criteria for a Mixed Episode” which is left out in a lot of thought processes.

Bipolar - EuphoricOne problem that is often encountered when diagnosing Bipolar disorder – or when trying to convince someone who has Bipolar disorder that they do, indeed have the illness – is that most of the “symptoms” of a Manic Episode appear to be “positive” or “happy.”  If you examine the wording – it looks on the surface and is often described as periods of “Euphoria” or extreme happiness.

In truth, many people with Bipolar disorder don’t have periods of “euphoria,” they don’t have what is perceived as “inflated self-esteem or grandiosity“, and they don’t seek out “excessive involvement in pleasurable activities.”  They may have “dysphoria,” they may believe that they have to do everything themselves, they may experience psychomotor agitation…they may be in a really active bad mood.

This is a state of “dysphoria.”  It is also called a “mixed state” where the Manic Episode and the Depressive Episode occur at the same time.  Features may include the racing thoughts, irritability, lack of sleep, psychomotor agitation of a Manic Episode but also include anhedonia or lack of enjoyment, inappropriate guilt, or suicidal thoughts which are symptoms of depression.

Unfortunately, this disconnects in presentation, and lack of awareness of mixed states (in both the patient and some professionals) often gives the bipolar patient an “easy out” in acceptance of the diagnosis.

Melissa Lind

Mixed Episode or Manic Episode with Mixed Features is given too little attention!

Roots of Mental Health Issues

Some of the Basics of Mental Health Issues

Mental health Delirium Tremens Fantasy

There are several different types of mental illnesses, and they all have some essence that prompts them to manifest somewhere in a person’s life. There are various conditions that people may suffer from including:

Adjustment disorders are common when a person has a hard time adapting to stress in their life.  Bipolar is another common disorder diagnosed in individuals, but this condition can easily be misconstrued and can be misdiagnosed. Bipolar or manic depression affects individuals and often includes symptoms such as:

In just a matter of minutes, these individuals seem to suffer from extreme highs to extreme lows.

They can literally drive a person crazy, and they should get immediate treatment for their mental health problems. These Delirium Tremens Dreamindividuals often threaten suicide, although many are just looking for attention and never attempt suicide. Conditions like this have a direct link to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and the problem is more neurological than physiological.

This problem is likely to be passed on in a family and has also been linked to genetics.

Some patients diagnosed as bipolar, have a family history of similar behavior with mood swings. Several of these chemical disorders are usually happening in their childhood, and trauma that the person sustained never received treatment.

Bipolar symptoms will occur if the trauma allows festering and the person never has to accept and deal with it.

Sexual disorders also occur in a similar way. These mental disorders are different from bipolar and other adjustment disorders. Sexual deviation is often linked to abuse, although not always. Pornography and other types of negative sexual behaviors are not necessarily abuse related.

However, recent studies have proved serial killers, and sociopathic behaviors are genetic. Some studies have linked these conditions to child abuse, and this may be the case in some instances, but not necessary all instances. Sexual disorders are mental, and there have been links of psychological impairments that cause interruptions in the brain`s processes which cause this Dementiabehavior to manifest itself.

Dementia and delirium are brain disorders that tend to manifest themselves in older individuals.

These cause memory loss and confusion.

If the patient is in a developing face, memory loss and confusion might be difficult to determine since the condition could be caused by other mental health illnesses in young individuals.

Teen Bipolar Disorder and Their Unique Challenges

Teen bipolar disorder is diagnosed more frequently.

bipolar-imagesBecause of the unique challenges, Teen bipolar disorder is diagnosed more frequently each year – as it should be. Manic depression is always a serious disorder, but when younger people are in the throes of the disease, it poses some additional challenges. Let us look at some of the unique problems of handling teen bipolar disorder.

First, we should probably take a moment to discuss what bipolar disorders are. In the simplest of terms, one is bipolar when they cycle between deep emotional lows and inappropriate emotional highs. Those who are bipolar experience periods of depression and, on the other end of the emotional spectrum, episodes of outright mania. Behavior on both ends is often potentially dangerous, and this illness can be exceptionally challenging for anyone.

Teen bipolar disorder refers to cases of the disorder diagnosed in young people.

Manic depression is difficult for any sufferer, but teens often have a more difficult time than others do. There are a few reasons.

First, the teen years are a period during which self-confidence is already often lacking. It is a trying period of self-discovery for emotionally healthy kids. There are those who try to take the gauntlet of issues, and learning experiences that are essential to the phase of life while simultaneously suffering from a debilitating mental health issue. This is not surprisingly, but can be quite traumatized by the experience.

This trauma is multiplied, in some sense, by the fact that younger people are yet to develop solid coping skills. Bipolar disorder can adversely affect even the most world-weary adult, but when it occurs with a younger person, they may be totally blindsided by its challenges.

Additionally, the nature of the age makes teen bipolar disorder more difficult for families and loved ones to spot the illness. Hormonal changes and social pressures often make teens “moody.” It can be hard for many parents to distinguish between manic depressive tendencies and traditional teen behavior. Catching the disease early in its development is always preferable, but when manic depression strikes a teenager, that can be extremely difficult.

Third, teen bipolar disorder takes place at a horrible time in terms of social development. Kids in this age group are involved with school, activities and socialization that can help them to learn how to function successfully as adults. That learning process can be short-circuited when a child is simultaneously dealing with manic depression.

Fortunately, teen bipolar disorder is treatable. Pharmaceutical and cognitive therapies can help bring the condition under control, allowing the victim to experience a tremendously improved quality of life. Successful treatment of the problem does require professional medical intervention. If one is, or knows, a teen who is exhibiting signs of a potential bipolar disorder, medical intervention is essential.

Although no mental health condition is “easy,” circumstances can create additional layers of challenge. Such is the case with teen bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder and Social Media

Use Bipolar Chat as a Means of Support?

Bipolar disorder chatting online is currently the preferred option for the growing support for people suffering from bipolar disorder (sometimes known as manic depression).Bipolar Online Chat

While bipolar chat option will not replace an appropriate treatment option recommended, everyone can provide some benefits for other bipolar people.

As the Internet has grown, the opportunity to interact with similar interests and conditions has increased.

Although we often assume that the social possibilities in terms of the fans to discuss their passions or professional exchange of ideas, it will also result in the creation of discussion groups and chat rooms for those suffering from certain diseases. The bipolar chat is an example of this phenomenon.

Despite a certain level of social development, mental illness still carries a stigma. Also, just based on symptoms, mental health problems can make people feel marginalized, and can stimulate ineffective separation. In discussing these issues with others in a supportive environment, some of the negative consequences can be minimized.

When there is someone to talk with, bipolar chat can allow victims of depression to feel less alone with their problem. It can help them realize that their struggle with the burden of this disease is not unique to them. This can reduce the feeling of being “out” and can give positive reinforcement as one continue to deal with the condition.

In some situations, bipolar chat may be one of the only real ways in how people can appraise significantly, and interact with other people who suffers from the illness. Those in rural areas or small towns cannot always have a “face to face” is an option, and then online bipolar chat can be extremely useful.

Others may feel uncomfortable with the “face” the situation and still be able to get some therapeutic value of bipolar disorder chat.

Although the online chat option can help, should not replace professional advice or therapy sessions prescribed. The support offered by a group chat can be brilliant but will allow coping skills, and information offered by the program receives professional treatment.

Nevertheless; we should not eliminate the need for bipolar chat medical use of drugs.

We must recognize that bipolar disorder is a hugely serious medical problem that requires * professional medical assistance. * Self-help in the form of a bipolar chat or other possibilities should be done only with the approval of a physician. In some cases, doctors may recommend that a person not involved in the effort and patients should pay attention to medical advice.

Advances in technology led to the creation of a valuable resource for those suffering from mental illness. An opportunity to share and learn from others with a similar analysis can be reassuring and helpful, which is the main reason for the growth of online opportunities such as bipolar disorder chat.

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* professional medical assistance*

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