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mental health problems

Traumas as Social Interactions and Self Love

Malignant Self Love – Narcissism Revisited

Read “Traumas as Social Interactions” by Dr. Sam Vaknin, l (accessed August 12, 2015)

We react to serious mishaps, life altering setbacks, disasters, abuse, and death by going through the phases of grieving. Traumas are the complex outcomes of psychodynamic and biochemical processes. But the particulars of traumas depend heavily on the interaction between the victim and his social milieu.

It would seem that while the victim progresses from denial to helplessness, rage, depression and thence to acceptance of the traumatizing events – society demonstrates a diametrically opposed progression. This incompatibility, this mismatch of psychological phases is what leads to the formation and crystallization of trauma.

Self Love

Victim Phase I – DENIAL

The magnitude of such unfortunate events is often so overwhelming, their nature so alien, and their message so menacing – that denial sets in as a defense mechanism aimed at self-preservation. The victim denies that the event occurred, that he or she is being abused, that a loved one passed away.

Society Phase I – ACCEPTANCE, MOVING ON

The victim’s nearest (“Society”) – his colleagues, his employees, his clients, even his spouse, children, and friends – rarely experience the events with the same shattering intensity. They are likely to accept the bad news and move on. Even at their most considerate and emphatic, they are likely to lose patience with the victim’s state of mind. They tend to ignore the victim or chastise him, to mock, or to deride his feelings or behavior, to collude to repress the painful memories, or to trivialize them.

Summary Phase I

The mismatch between the victim’s reactive patterns and emotional needs and society’s matter-of-fact attitude hinders growth and healing.
The victim requires society’s help in avoiding a head-on confrontation with a reality he cannot digest. Instead, the society serves as a constant and mentally destabilizing reminder of the root of the victim’s unbearable agony (the Job syndrome).

Victim phase II – HELPLESSNESS

Denial gradually gives way to a sense of all-pervasive and humiliating failure, often accompanied by debilitating fatigue and
mental disintegration. These are among the classic symptoms of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).
These are the bitter results of the internalization and integration of the harsh realization that there is nothing one can do to alter the outcomes of a natural, or man-made, catastrophe. The horror in confronting one’s finiteness, meaninglessness, eligibility, and powerlessness – is overpowering.

Society Phase II – DEPRESSION

The more the members of society come to grips with the magnitude of the loss, or evil, or threat represented by the grief inducing events – the sadder they become. Depression is often little more than suppressed or self-directed anger. The anger, in this case, is belatedly caused by an identified or diffuse source of threat, or of evil, or loss. It is a higher level variant of the “fight or flight” reaction, tempered by the rational understanding that the “source” is often too abstract to tackle directly.

Summary Phase II

Thus, when the victim is most in need, terrified by his helplessness and adrift – society is immersed in depression and unable to provide a holding and supporting environment.
Growth and healing are again retarded by social interaction.
The victim’s innate sense of annulment is enhanced by the self-addressed anger (=depression) of those around him.

PHASE III

Both the victim and society react with RAGE to their predicaments. In an effort to Narcissistically reassert himself, the victim develops a grandiose sense of anger directed at paranoidly selected, unreal, diffuse, and abstract targets (=frustration sources).
By expressing aggression, the victim re-acquires mastery of the world and himself.

Members of society use rage to re-direct the cause of their depression (which is, as we said, self-directed anger) and to channel it safely. To ensure that this expressed aggression alleviates their depression – real targets must are selected and real punishments meted out. In this respect, “social rage” differs from the victim. The former is intended to sublimate aggression and channel it in a socially acceptable manner – the latter to reassert narcissistic self-love as an antidote to an all-devouring sense of helplessness.

In other words, society, by itself, being in a state of rage, positively enforces the narcissistic rage reactions of the grieving victim. This, in the long run, is counter-productive, inhibits personal growth, and prevents healing. It
also erodes the reality test of the victim and encourages self-delusions, paranoid ideation, and ideas of reference.

Victim Phase IV – DEPRESSION

As the consequences of narcissistic rage – both social and personal – grow more unacceptable, depression sets in. The victim internalizes his aggressive impulses. Self-directed anger is safer but is the cause of great sadness and even suicidal ideation. The victim’s depression is a way of conforming to social norms. It is also instrumental in ridding the victim of the unhealthy
residues of narcissistic regression. It is when the victim acknowledges the malignancy of his rage (and its anti-social nature) that he adopts a depressive stance.

Society Phase IV – HELPLESSNESS

People around the victim (“society”) also emerge from their phase of rage transformed. As they realize the futility of their anger,
they feel more and more helpless and devoid of options. They grasp their limitations and the irrelevance of their good intentions. They accept the inevitability of loss and evil and Kafkaesque agree to live under an ominous cloud of arbitrary judgment, meted out by impersonal powers.

Summary Phase IV

Again, the members of society are unable to help the victim to emerge from a self-destructive phase. His depression is enhanced by their apparent helplessness. Their introversion and inefficacy induce in the victim a feeling of nightmarish isolation and alienation. Healing and growth are once again retarded or even inhibited.

Victim Phase V – ACCEPTANCE AND MOVING ON

Depression – if pathologically protracted and in conjunction with other mental health problems – sometimes leads to suicide. But more often, it allows the victim to process mentally hurtful and potentially harmful material and paves the way to acceptance. Depression is a laboratory of the psyche. Withdrawal from social pressures enables the direct transformation of anger into other emotions, some of them otherwise socially unacceptable. The honest encounter between the victim and his (possible) death often becomes a cathartic and self-empowering inner dynamic. The victim emerges ready to move on.

Society Phase V – DENIAL

Society, on the other hand, having exhausted its reactive arsenal – resorts to denial. As memories fade and as the victim recovers and abandons his obsessive-compulsive dwelling on his pain – society feels morally justified to forget and forgive. This mood of historical revisionism, of moral leniency, of effusive forgiveness, of re-interpretation, and of a refusal to remember in detail – leads to a repression and denial of the painful events in society.

Summary Phase V

This final mismatch between the victim’s emotional needs and society’s reactions is less damaging to the victim. He is now more
resilient, stronger, more flexible, and more willing to forgive and forget. Society’s denial is really a denial of the victim. But, having
ridden himself of more primitive narcissistic defenses – the victim can do without society’s acceptance, approval, or look. Having endured the purgatory of grieving, he has now re-acquired his self, independent of society’s acknowledgment.

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Suffering from anxiety disorder and have panic attacks?

Do you have anxiety?
Are you constantly worried?

We all probably know that anxiety is a normal part of life.  That horrible feeling of anxiousness is something that can happen to all of us from time to time — and with good reason. However, many people suffer from anxiety without any valid reason — regardless of how correct the reason for the anxiety seems to them.

Anxiety can cause a host of other mental health problems.
Child AnxietyFirst, when the brain is stressed, the body’s immune system fails to function properly. Things like this leads to illnesses. Second, anxiety can prevent one from living life to the fullest. And, finally, stress can lead to full-blown anxiety attacks, otherwise known as panic attacks.

A panic attack might feel like a heart attack. In fact, when one suffers their first panic attack, this is what they think that it is, in most cases. They will usually seek out medical emergency services. A lot of the symptoms are often the same as a heart attack. The person may feel chest pains, have trouble catching their breath, become dizzy, feel nauseous, and also feel completely out of control.

AnxiousLuckily, you won’t die from a panic attack — even though you can’t be convinced of that when it is happening. Even better news is that panic attacks can be prevented. Medication can be prescribed, relaxation techniques can be used, and counseling, in the form of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) can be sought.

Your doctor will most likely prescribe an antidepressant for your anxiety. However, antidepressants take about three weeks to become effective, and during this time, you may discover that you are more anxious than you were before. Panic attacks may become more severe during this time.

For reasons mentioned, your doctor may also prescribe a benzodiazepine. The benzodiazepine will effectively take care of the anxious feelings, and help to prevent panic attacks. However, this is not a safe long-term drug, as antidepressants are. Therefore, after about three weeks, your doctor will most likely discontinue the benzodiazepine, and continue with the antidepressant. Naturally, CBT will also be recommended.

Panic attacks are very real — and very scary. If you suffer from panic attacks, know that there is treatment out there, and with that treatment, you can avoid future panic attacks.

Stress and Anxiety – Is There Any Relationship? (Free PDF)

Panic attacks and anxiety disorder sufferers

The Experience of People with Mental Health Problems

Volunteers for a study to examine: The Experience of People with Mental Health Problems.

 The Univeristy of ManchesterI am at the University of Manchester working on a project that is investigating experiences of people with mental health problems in order to develop interventions to challenge mental health stigma. Previous research has shown that stigma is one of the greatest challenges facing people with mental illness.

I am writing to you because I would very much like your members to take part in my study. My study involves filling out a questionnaire, which includes questions regarding perceived stigma, sleep, and mood. Your participation is entirely voluntary and you can withdraw at any time with no penalty to you. This study will last 30 minutes.

Participation in this study will be greatly appreciated, as help from people with mental health problems is indispensable and greatly valued.

The study has been granted full ethical approval from the University of Manchester’s Senate Committee on the Ethics of Research on Human Beings. All data collected will remain anonymous and confidential at all times. More information can be found in the attached Participant Information Sheet. I have also attached the questionnaire for you to read through.
I have included a web link to my online questionnaire; if you agree to take part in my project could this link please be distributed to your members.

Thank you very much in advance for your consideration. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you require any additional information.

I look forward to hear from you!
Yours sincerely
Farrah Stephenson

Web link to Questionnaire: http://www.psych-sci.manchester.ac.uk/

The Experience of People with Mental Health Problems

Anxiety and Depression – Sect Story of a Musician

Break free from anxiety and depression made by others! Even by sects.

In 1992, I came into a sect that was the beginning to my breakdown and serious problems with anxiety and depression.

Bipolar Disorder Depression and AnxietyIn the beginning, everything looked nice in this sect. The people there showed me so much love that I was convinced that they had the “one truth”!

They used the Bible to show that I had to give away everything that could come between me and God, (in fact, everything that made my life worth living!) I had to give away my family; friends were forbidden, forbidden to enjoy food for real and so on. One of these sacrifices was my love for piano music. I was not allowed to play the piano for several years! I had to give away everything that made my life good! I felt more and more alone.

And I felt that God hated me. It was a lot of focus on that God is judging us and that it is very, very easy to come to hell. Even if I “do the best I can” to be a “right” Christian.

In 2000, I was mentally broken down. I was so depressed, and my life was so filled with anxiety that I did not want to live anymore. I felt so alone. God felt far away and against me. I believed I would come to hell, was terribly afraid demons, had no friends, and I should not be attached to my family.

But I did something important at that time: I went to therapists, and they helped me a lot. Three times I was in a mental hospital, and I got a lot of help during many years. Step by step I felt better and better. Today I still feel some anxiety and some depression, but it is much better now.

Recovering From Anxiety and DepressionI started to take back all the things I did loose in the sect. Family, friends and so on. In 2013, I had four talk shows in Norway, telling about my history in a sect. It was full-booked. Newspapers and TV was very interested and shared my story.

Also, I took back the piano music! I started to play and make my own music again. The pain I experienced I put into my music! I wanted to express it, wanted to express hope and longing. November 2013 I made an album on iTunes “Waiting for Better Days” and a music video to it. Everything is self-made, and it is a good feeling to see that I can manage in some areas of life again.

I want to inspire others with mental health problems that there is hope. Tell them that it is therapy for me, to make music. Hopefully my story can encourage others to break free if they are in a sect like the one I where in. You can listen to my music on the page Music as Therapy. If you like what you hear more, go to “Waiting for Better Days” on iTunes? Feel free to share to people you think might like it, or even need music like mine.

Jon Harald Gjesdal

https://www.facebook.com/jonharaldgjesdal

Untreated Anxiety

Untreated anxiety is an extremely real problem.

According to the NIMH, or National Institute of Mental Health, more than 19 million Americans suffer from anxiety disorders. Unfortunately, a study conducted by the Anxiety Disorders Association of America (ADAA), done in 1999, found that only about one-third of those people seek treatment. Of those who do seek treatment, the stress may be grossly misdiagnosed, and, therefore, not treated properly.

Untreated AnxietyUntreated anxiety is absolutely a real problem — and that question just grows as long as it is left untreated. Anxiety can eventually dominate your life, preventing you from living your life to the fullest potential. Long-term anxiety can even lead to depression or increased anxieties, which in turn will most likely progress to anxiety, or panic attacks.

Anxiety is stress, but it is extreme stress. When the brain is stressed, the immune system does not function properly, and this makes you more subject to illnesses, and will also make it difficult to get over illnesses that you do have. Common problems associated with anxiety include increased blood pressure, digestive problems, stomach problems, and sleep disorders. You may also experience stress related aches and pains, diarrhea, and dizziness.

These are not temporary problems. As long as the anxiety remains untreated, these problems will not only persist — they will expand into even worse mental health problems. Nobody dies from anxiety attacks, but they can certainly die from health problems that are brought on by the stress of anxiety.

Many people don’t seek treatment for anxiety because they feel as it is “normal” and that no treatment is needed. In most cases, anxiety is normal. We all feel anxious when things aren’t going well or when truly awful things happen.

However, no matter what the cause of the anxiety, if it is a long term, and left untreated, the problems that are coming are even worse than the ones that you are experiencing today. Do yourself, your mind and your body a favor — seek treatment!

Roots of Mental Health Issues

Some of the Basics of Mental Health Issues

Mental health Delirium Tremens Fantasy

There are several different types of mental illnesses, and they all have some essence that prompts them to manifest somewhere in a person’s life. There are various conditions that people may suffer from including:

Adjustment disorders are common when a person has a hard time adapting to stress in their life.  Bipolar is another common disorder diagnosed in individuals, but this condition can easily be misconstrued and can be misdiagnosed. Bipolar or manic depression affects individuals and often includes symptoms such as:

In just a matter of minutes, these individuals seem to suffer from extreme highs to extreme lows.

They can literally drive a person crazy, and they should get immediate treatment for their mental health problems. These Delirium Tremens Dreamindividuals often threaten suicide, although many are just looking for attention and never attempt suicide. Conditions like this have a direct link to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and the problem is more neurological than physiological.

This problem is likely to be passed on in a family and has also been linked to genetics.

Some patients diagnosed as bipolar, have a family history of similar behavior with mood swings. Several of these chemical disorders are usually happening in their childhood, and trauma that the person sustained never received treatment.

Bipolar symptoms will occur if the trauma allows festering and the person never has to accept and deal with it.

Sexual disorders also occur in a similar way. These mental disorders are different from bipolar and other adjustment disorders. Sexual deviation is often linked to abuse, although not always. Pornography and other types of negative sexual behaviors are not necessarily abuse related.

However, recent studies have proved serial killers, and sociopathic behaviors are genetic. Some studies have linked these conditions to child abuse, and this may be the case in some instances, but not necessary all instances. Sexual disorders are mental, and there have been links of psychological impairments that cause interruptions in the brain`s processes which cause this Dementiabehavior to manifest itself.

Dementia and delirium are brain disorders that tend to manifest themselves in older individuals.

These cause memory loss and confusion.

If the patient is in a developing face, memory loss and confusion might be difficult to determine since the condition could be caused by other mental health illnesses in young individuals.