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Treatment of Depression Medication – Paxil

Medication in use for treatment of depression – Paxil

Paxil is one of the most highly prescribed medications for the treatment of depression. It has proven over time to be extremely safe and effective. Over the years, the makers of Paxil have created Paxil CR, or Paxil Controlled Release, which is the preferred Paxil choice of many doctors.

Paxil helps to treat depression that is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, as well as all other depression. Paxil works with neurotransmitters in the brain to adjust the level of serotonin that is being produced.

As with many medications, there are potential side effects. These include dry mouth, diarrhea, sweating, tremors, appetite changes, constipation, nausea, decreased or increased sex drive, insomnia, abnormal vision, drowsiness, and weakness. Paxil is only prescribed for adults aged 18 or older as research has found that many serotonin-producing drugs increase the presence of suicidal tendencies in young people.

Paxil is not addictive; however, your body may react to the discontinuance of the drug, and you may suffer from withdrawal symptoms that include abnormal dreams, agitation, nausea, headache, fatigue, and changes in sleep patterns.

Treatment of DepressionMost doctors will monitor your progress after being taken off Paxil, and may opt to wean the patient off of the medication instead. In most cases, Paxil will not be prescribed if you are pregnant or nursing.

Again, most people really don’t have any trouble with Paxil, and find that it is very effective for the treatment of depression, and all of the symptoms that go along with depression. Paxil is covered by most prescription drug insurance plans and is affordable even without insurance coverage.

If you or a loved one suffers from depression, Paxil is a treatment that should be considered. Discuss this issue with a doctor.

Based on your health history, your doctor may decide that Paxil is not for you. Be sure to give your doctor a complete medical history before being prescribed Paxil.

There will probably always be side effects from medications, also medications in use for treatment of depression; as you can find out by watching the documentary video on the page; “Mental Health Videos“. They claim that they can provide facts about psychotropic medications and the huge profits they create for the pharmaceutical industry.

Later we will have a look at another drug used in treatment of depression!

Suicide in Depression

Why does treatment for depression increase the risk of suicide?

Whether you are bipolar or suffer from major depressive disorder – when you start taking medication for depression, your risk of suicide actually goes up for a short period of time.

The risk of suicide in depression

Every time an advertisement for a medication for depressive disorder or bipolar depression comes on the television, one thing that seems to stick out is the warning that states “May increase the risk of suicide“.  This is often an arguing point for people who are opposed to psychiatric medications.  If it is supposed to improve your mood, why does the risk of suicide go up?  Shouldn’t the opposite be true?

How do antidepressants work?

Antidepressant medications work by increasing the activity of neurotransmitters in the mood centers of the brain.  Nerve cell signals are transmitted by the release of chemicals known as neurotransmitters.  These include naturally occurring chemicals such as serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine.  The neurotransmitter is released from one cell which signals the next cell to react.  The same cell then “gathers up” the neurotransmitter to be used again later.

Most antidepressants specifically work by blocking the “reuptake” of neurotransmitters so that they are in the synapses or spaces between the nerve cells for a longer period of time.  This increases the likelihood that the neurotransmitter will send a “happy” signal to the next cell – sooner.

Why do antidepressants increase the risk of suicide?

Suicide and DepressionThe problem with depression and how long it takes to recover is twofold, because depression involves both mood and energy levels.  In a person with depression, the mood state is lowered because there are often not enough neurotransmitters available.  This leads to the mental effects of depression causing sadness and an inability to enjoy normal activities.  There is also a corresponding drop in energy levels making the victim lethargic and sleepy.

When antidepressants are prescribed, most healthcare practitioners make it pretty clear that the mood state will not really begin to get noticeably better for at least 2 to 3 weeks. What is not always made clear is that energy levels actually begin to improve before the mood level is increased.

Once this person with low mood level and low energy level begins to take antidepressant medication, their energy levels go up fairly quickly.  The mood level, however, stays depressed – sad and unable to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

If patients had been thinking of suicide as part of their depression, they may not have had the energy to make actual plans or to carry them out.  Once their energy levels are boosted – they may find themselves still having the same thoughts, but this time – able to act.

Are the newer medications worse?

This increased risk of suicide is not new, despite what the media has portrayed.  It is not specific to a certain medication or even a certain kind of medication.  It is a fact, a well-known risk that has existed since the beginnings of treatment of depression.

Suicide and MedicationOur medications, today, are really much less dangerous than medications of old.  Thirty years ago, your choices for the treatment of depression included only tricyclics such as Elavil and Tofranil or MAO inhibitors such as Parnate.  Both of these medication types carried a lot of very debilitating side effects (dry mouth, constipation, excessive sweating, dizziness, and food intolerances) as well as the increased risk of suicide.  While they were effective, they were also quite dangerous in the event of an overdose – possibly resulting in death.

We now have more advanced medications – the SSRIs or Serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors, Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) and newer MAO inhibitors that have much fewer side effects and are less likely to result in a serious overdose – but they have not been able to eliminate the actual risk of suicide.  This is inherent in the treatment of depression because the energy improves before the mood.

With older medications, the psychiatrist would often only prescribe a few days’ worth of medication at a time because the old medications could be dangerous if too many were taken and lead to overdose by someone trying to commit suicide.  This often meant that the patient was seen once a week or more often during the first month.

Now that overdose is not such a risk, physicians often prescribe an entire months’ worth of meds at once, and no one keeps track of the patient during this dangerous period  – giving them plenty of time to plan and act.  Generally the newer medications cannot be used as a suicide tool but it does not stop patients from finding other tools.

What can help decrease the risk?

The solution is to know your patient – know your friends, know your family.  If you have a friend or relative who has been depressed and is placed on medication, be aware.Check on them frequently. Drag them around to social activities, out to eat, to outdoor events. Note any changes or patterns that indicate they may be considering suicide.  Help them through the funk.  You may get on their nerves, but you may also save their life.

A little effort and toleration of irritating friends is way better than going to a funeral and wishing you had done something.

 

Newer medications used for prevention of suicide in depression are much less dangerous than medications of old.

What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

So, what causes Bipolar disorder?

It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers, that causes Bipolar disorder…

Bipolar doctor

Manic depression, also called bipolar disorder, causes severe mood swings that can last for weeks or even months.

Everyone feels happy or sad sometimes. For someone with manic depression, however, these mood swings are much more intense. Scientists have not identified a single factor what causes bipolar disorder. Instead, it may have one or more of several different causes. These may be broken down into genetic, environmental and physiological causes.

There are three types of manic depression.

Bipolar Type I is characterized by at least one manic episode. A manic episode is a feeling of intense elation, restlessness and loss of inhibitions and over-activity. Sufferers during a manic episode may sleep for only three or four hours a night if at all.

Bipolar Type II, where there may be frequent episodes of depression with only mild manic episodes (called hypomania). Rapid cycling involves four or more mood swings over the period of a year.

Finally, there is Cyclothymia, where the mood swings last longer but they are less severe.

Genes is considered to be a contributing factor.

If one of your relatives has manic depression, there is a reasonable chance that you will develop it, too. Chromosome numbers 6 and 8 appear to have been implicated. Children of bipolar parents have an eight percent chance of developing the condition, compared with one percent in the general population.

A chemical imbalance in the brain may cause the disorder. Nerve signals travel from one neuron to another by way of chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. It is possible that excess levels of norepinephrine may cause a manic episode.

During a depressive episode, levels of this neurotransmitter may be excessively low. The picture, however, is not that simple, as there are other neurotransmitters involved.

Mood swings can also be triggered by stress. Abuse; either physical, emotional or sexual, may trigger an episode. Bereavement or the breakdown of a close relationship may also be a trigger.

Not all stressful triggers are negative experiences. A positive change, such as a marriage or a birth can also make a contribution.

Once diagnosed, the condition can be treated or controlled, although certain risk factors may trigger a recurrence. Failure to comply with medication carries a high risk of recurrence, as do alcohol or drug abuse. Other risk factors include poor support systems. For example, the lack of caring friends or relatives or an erratic lifestyle.

Manic depression can lead to psychosocial disturbances.

For example, Bipolar Type I and Bipolar Type II are associated with a high absentee rate at work. There is also a higher rate of suicide attempts and hospital admissions with these conditions. While both conditions have high rates of attempted suicides, Type II sufferers seem to have fewer hospital admissions than Type I, and consequently miss fewer days at work.

So, what causes bipolar disorder? It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers.

Complying with medication, adopting a stable lifestyle, and developing healthy coping strategies, may all keep the condition under control.

It is essential to consult a medical professional and not attempt self diagnosis.