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Stress All around You

Some of the first signs of stress in your life are health related

Stress, known as “the silent killer”, and it definitely creeps up on you without warning. So how do you know if you have too much stress in your life?

Anxiety and HeadacheStress can affect your body; your muscles start to ache for no reason, and you suffer from headaches. Your mental focus is altered, as well. Your concentration levels drop and your interest in certain things disappear. Plus your overall enjoyment of life decreases.

It is crucial to be aware of these symptoms, and to take action. Stress is just the first step on a road that potentially could lead to things like suffering from a heart attack, or having to deal with anxiety or depression.

The problem is that stress is everywhere. You have to deal with everyday stress in your life. This includes the normal running around of preparing for work each day, getting your kids off to school and taking care of your home. All before you have even had a chance to do something nice for yourself!

At work you are pressured to get your job done on time, you may be asked to work extra hours, or take on additional tasks when someone is sick or on vacation. You oblige as you don’t want to be a whiner, but all this does is increase your stress levels.

It is vital that you learn how to say no. You want to make an effort to get some ‘me time’. Take 30 minutes a day where you do nothing but focus on yourself! Without that, you could be on the road to health issues, both mental and physical.

On top of this, anxiety jumps out at you from the television, on the internet and even in newspapers. You have read about tragic events that can be upsetting. You may feel pressured into needing to buy a better car, or to get the newest Smartphone that just was released.

When you think about all of these things, no wonder you feel as though you are living in a whirlwind. Start today and make a point of finding some small way of spending just a few minutes on you!
Unplug, unwind and relax.

Depression in Young Children

Child’s may become depressed because of several different things

Today, we are more aware of teenage depression, but there still isn’t enough said about depression in younger children. Depression in young children is not as common as teenage depression, but it does still exist, and it is still a significant problem. Did you realize that even babies can suffer from depression?

Depression in ChildrenIn children, depression shows itself through developmental delays, failure to thrive, sleeping and eating problems, social withdrawal or anxiety, separation anxiety, and dangerous behavior. Unfortunately, children are not yet equipped to express depressed feelings in simple words. They may not even be old enough to know what those feelings are. So, for the most part, a child’s depression is expressed in other ways and actions.

When an adult becomes depressed, their first stop may be their medical doctor’s office, followed by an appointment with a therapist. With children, it does not necessarily work this way. Instead, you may need an appointment with a child psychologist so that an assessment for depression can be done, using the Children’s Depression Inventory.

If the child psychologist determines that the child is indeed depressed, he or she may want a physical workup done by the child’s pediatrician to determine whether the cause of the depression is physical. A child may be depressed because there is simply a family history of depression. (Genetically illness) Child’s become depressed because of things going on in their lives, or because of a medical problem.

In most cases of depression in children, the cause of the depression can be associated with more than one of these causes. So, if your child is found to be depressed, and medical reason for it is discovered, you should still seek out answers and determine if one of the other factors — problems in their lives or genetics — are also contributing.

The important thing is to watch your child closely. Is your child getting along with other children? Are they growing and developing as they should? If either of these things isn`t happening, you should seek help before the problem escalates.

Depression in children is not as common as depression in teenagers!

What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

So, what causes Bipolar disorder?

It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers, that causes Bipolar disorder…

Bipolar doctor

Manic depression, also called bipolar disorder, causes severe mood swings that can last for weeks or even months.

Everyone feels happy or sad sometimes. For someone with manic depression, however, these mood swings are much more intense. Scientists have not identified a single factor what causes bipolar disorder. Instead, it may have one or more of several different causes. These may be broken down into genetic, environmental and physiological causes.

There are three types of manic depression.

Bipolar Type I is characterized by at least one manic episode. A manic episode is a feeling of intense elation, restlessness and loss of inhibitions and over-activity. Sufferers during a manic episode may sleep for only three or four hours a night if at all.

Bipolar Type II, where there may be frequent episodes of depression with only mild manic episodes (called hypomania). Rapid cycling involves four or more mood swings over the period of a year.

Finally, there is Cyclothymia, where the mood swings last longer but they are less severe.

Genes is considered to be a contributing factor.

If one of your relatives has manic depression, there is a reasonable chance that you will develop it, too. Chromosome numbers 6 and 8 appear to have been implicated. Children of bipolar parents have an eight percent chance of developing the condition, compared with one percent in the general population.

A chemical imbalance in the brain may cause the disorder. Nerve signals travel from one neuron to another by way of chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. It is possible that excess levels of norepinephrine may cause a manic episode.

During a depressive episode, levels of this neurotransmitter may be excessively low. The picture, however, is not that simple, as there are other neurotransmitters involved.

Mood swings can also be triggered by stress. Abuse; either physical, emotional or sexual, may trigger an episode. Bereavement or the breakdown of a close relationship may also be a trigger.

Not all stressful triggers are negative experiences. A positive change, such as a marriage or a birth can also make a contribution.

Once diagnosed, the condition can be treated or controlled, although certain risk factors may trigger a recurrence. Failure to comply with medication carries a high risk of recurrence, as do alcohol or drug abuse. Other risk factors include poor support systems. For example, the lack of caring friends or relatives or an erratic lifestyle.

Manic depression can lead to psychosocial disturbances.

For example, Bipolar Type I and Bipolar Type II are associated with a high absentee rate at work. There is also a higher rate of suicide attempts and hospital admissions with these conditions. While both conditions have high rates of attempted suicides, Type II sufferers seem to have fewer hospital admissions than Type I, and consequently miss fewer days at work.

So, what causes bipolar disorder? It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers.

Complying with medication, adopting a stable lifestyle, and developing healthy coping strategies, may all keep the condition under control.

It is essential to consult a medical professional and not attempt self diagnosis.