Archives for 

restlessness

Teenager Depression and Moodiness

Don`t confuse moodiness with depression

These days, we recognize more and more that the pressures put on our children do indeed bring on depression. There was a time that if a teenager — or an adult for that matter — suffered from depression, it was kept silent, and only certain members of the family were aware of the problem (if they were aware at all).

Today, that is no longer the case. There has been so much research done in the area of depression that it is now an “open” topic. Thankfully, teenagers are more aware that they are not alone with their feelings or problems and that help is available.

Depressed Young Girl with HangoverTeenagers are often moody. That is a natural part of being a teenager, and it is caused by the chemical changes in the brain as they go through puberty. However, moodiness should not be confused with depression — and vice versa.

The symptoms of depression in teenagers include:

•    Irritability anger or hostility
•    Tearfulness
•    Crying
•    Withdrawal from friends, family, and usual activities
•    Sadness or hopelessness
•    Changes in sleeping patterns
•    Changes in appetite
•    Agitation
•    Restlessness
•    Lack of motivation
•    Fatigue
•    Difficulty focusing
•    Difficulty making decisions
•    Thoughts of suicide and increased thoughts of death in general

Teenager Depression SpecialistAside from these general symptoms of depression, one must be aware that teenagers express their feelings in ways that are different than most adults. For example, your child may start experiencing problems at school, run away from home, start experimenting with and abusing drugs or alcohol, develop an eating disorder, become addicted to the Internet, injure themselves on purpose, become violent, have a general reckless behavior, or attempt suicide.

Treatment for a depressed teen starts at home, where the parents need to discover whether the child is depressed or not or whether something else may be causing the problem.

It is important that your teen understands that he or she is loved and accepted and that you are there for them. An appointment with a family doctor is needed, and he or she will most likely point you to a specialist that is qualified to deal with teenagers depression.

A specialist is best-qualified to deal with teenager depression

Generalized Anxiety Disorder – GAD

GAD – More than a Worrywart.

Everybody worries from time to time, but a person worrying extends to interrupt daily life and cause debilitating anxiety, those persons may have Generalized Anxiety Disorder, or, in short – GAD. While people with GAD may start out by worrying about everyday things, this disorder can easily take over people’s life and be the cause other medical problems. If one thinks they have GAD, one should see a doctor immediately and talk about various treatment options.

General Anxiety DisorderPeople with GAD worry about everyday things like money, health, relationships, and jobs. It is normal to worry about these things, even on a daily basis. However, if a person has GAD, worries are constant and excessive, and in many cases, irrational. People diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder are often distracted and consumed with fear. These things are something that is difficult to think about, and it is difficult to do anything else but think of all that worries. To be worried is a part of life for everyone – from the moment one awakes to the moment one falls asleep, but that worries have no real foundation in reality.

Numerous of symptoms occur as a result of GAD. Such as; squeamishness, muscle tension, sleeping problems, exhaustion, breathing difficulties, changes in appetite, sweating or hot flashes, headache and restlessness. Medical professionals do not yet know what causes GAD. Treatment and diagnosis can, therefore, sometimes be difficult. If some of these symptoms are experiencing and one find they are worrying often, one should seek for medical help with what could be Generalized Anxiety Disorder.Anxious

It is essential to be extremely specific about the symptoms since treatment for GAD begins with ruling out other anxiety disorders. Treatment that works well can than include both therapy and medication. Every person worries in a different way, so every person needs different treatment, as well. To find the best form of medical treatment for his or hers GAD situations one should always work together with a doctor. Work with one`s own body`s wants and needs.

No matter why people have developed GAD, they can get help. Most people suffering from GAD do not know that they can be helped.

If people find themself constantly consumed with worries, they should talk to a doctor immediately to find out how medical treatment can help.
One may feel as though there is always something to worry about – from having enough money to pay for bills to getting that job promotion. In a normal life, one may think about these things at least once or twice a day.
A doctor can help achieve this, even if one has GAD.

More about GAD here (Video): Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and how it affects my life

What Causes Bipolar Disorder?

So, what causes Bipolar disorder?

It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers, that causes Bipolar disorder…

Bipolar doctor

Manic depression, also called bipolar disorder, causes severe mood swings that can last for weeks or even months.

Everyone feels happy or sad sometimes. For someone with manic depression, however, these mood swings are much more intense. Scientists have not identified a single factor what causes bipolar disorder. Instead, it may have one or more of several different causes. These may be broken down into genetic, environmental and physiological causes.

There are three types of manic depression.

Bipolar Type I is characterized by at least one manic episode. A manic episode is a feeling of intense elation, restlessness and loss of inhibitions and over-activity. Sufferers during a manic episode may sleep for only three or four hours a night if at all.

Bipolar Type II, where there may be frequent episodes of depression with only mild manic episodes (called hypomania). Rapid cycling involves four or more mood swings over the period of a year.

Finally, there is Cyclothymia, where the mood swings last longer but they are less severe.

Genes is considered to be a contributing factor.

If one of your relatives has manic depression, there is a reasonable chance that you will develop it, too. Chromosome numbers 6 and 8 appear to have been implicated. Children of bipolar parents have an eight percent chance of developing the condition, compared with one percent in the general population.

A chemical imbalance in the brain may cause the disorder. Nerve signals travel from one neuron to another by way of chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. It is possible that excess levels of norepinephrine may cause a manic episode.

During a depressive episode, levels of this neurotransmitter may be excessively low. The picture, however, is not that simple, as there are other neurotransmitters involved.

Mood swings can also be triggered by stress. Abuse; either physical, emotional or sexual, may trigger an episode. Bereavement or the breakdown of a close relationship may also be a trigger.

Not all stressful triggers are negative experiences. A positive change, such as a marriage or a birth can also make a contribution.

Once diagnosed, the condition can be treated or controlled, although certain risk factors may trigger a recurrence. Failure to comply with medication carries a high risk of recurrence, as do alcohol or drug abuse. Other risk factors include poor support systems. For example, the lack of caring friends or relatives or an erratic lifestyle.

Manic depression can lead to psychosocial disturbances.

For example, Bipolar Type I and Bipolar Type II are associated with a high absentee rate at work. There is also a higher rate of suicide attempts and hospital admissions with these conditions. While both conditions have high rates of attempted suicides, Type II sufferers seem to have fewer hospital admissions than Type I, and consequently miss fewer days at work.

So, what causes bipolar disorder? It appears to be an interplay of genetic and physiological factors, coupled with stressful triggers.

Complying with medication, adopting a stable lifestyle, and developing healthy coping strategies, may all keep the condition under control.

It is essential to consult a medical professional and not attempt self diagnosis.