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Face of Borderline Personality Disorder

Pro Football Player Brandon Marshall Wants to be the “face” of Borderline Personality Disorder

Brandon Marshall - The Face of Borderline Personality DisorderIf you don’t follow professional sports in the U.S., you may not know who Brandon Marshall is. He is an NFL Wide Receiver, recently acquired by the New York Jets. His long history of violent outbursts, brushes with law enforcement and behavioral issues that have affected both his personal and professional life.

Marshall had played professional football since 2006 when the Denver Broncos drafted him. He has since played for the Miami Dolphins, the Chicago Bears and was recently acquired by the New York Jets. The Wide Receiver played in five Pro-Bowls, receiving an MVP award in 2011 and has set several receiving records during his NFL career.

Brandon Marshall - BPDThough he has played for four different teams in only nine years, most of the trades have come after a series of injuries. Not all of those injuries, however, have come from football and Marshall has a long history of legal trouble, and those issues have affected various team’s willingness to put up with his erratic behavior.

One notable injury was sustained in 2008 when he slipped on an empty bag in McDonalds. While this seems like a complete accident, the incident occurred during a physical scuffle with “family members”. Shortly after the event, he fell through a television set at his home, causing a severe arm injury.

Marshall has faced multiple fines with the NFL including two penalties for violating the team’s dress code by wearing brightly colored cleats during a game. The list of legal troubles he has had include drunk driving charges, domestic violence, assault, battery and disorderly conduct. Marshall was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder in 2011.

Borderline Personality Disorder is not a well-known disorder and is highly stigmatized, with many people unwilling to disclose the condition. It is characterized by severe abandonment issues, risky behavior, personal identity issues, rapid changes in an Borderline Personality Disorder - Brandon Marshallemotional level, and high potential for self-harm. Treatment is largely comprised of behavioral therapy. However, some patients receive medication for other psychiatric disorders that may improve BPD symptoms. There is also some thought that medication treatment may be useful in Borderline Personality Disorder. However, no drugs are approved to treat the condition.

Marshall’s diagnosis of BPD likely comes as no surprise to those who understand the disorder. His willingness to come forward and publicly announce his condition may help others to understand BPD. He has been and is currently undergoing treatment and is in the process of filming a documentary about his battle with BPD. Marshall has stated that his goal is to be the “face” of Borderline Personality Disorder to bring public awareness for those who struggle with the condition.

Though he has been forthright, many in the sports world had stated that the New York Jets will have their hands full when he joins the team as his troubles have decreased only slightly since he began treatment.

Melissa Lind

Is It Really Borderline Personality Disorder?

Borderline Personality Disorder is one of the hardest disorders to diagnose

Borderline Personality DisorderMy diagnosis is formal and was made by a professional.  Don’t use this to diagnose yourself.  We’re all people, we’re all different.  While I match many of the diagnostic criteria, I don’t match them all.  However, if you haven’t been formally diagnosed and you’re reading this and nodding your head, you may want to talk to a professional about it.

So here goes.  What makes Bruce Anderson suffer from Borderline Personalty Disorder (and what doesn’t).

Signs and Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder:

1.  Feels emotions more easily, deeply, and longer than others do—CHECK.

Is this a bad thing?  Sometimes.  But sometimes it’s good.  If I wasn’t able to keep those emotions running high, I could’ve never written my prizewinning screenplay, which is emotionally brutal and makes everyone who reads it cry.  But when I get hurt, it takes a long, long time to shut it off.  Something most people get over in a few hours can take me a few days or more.

2.  Exhibits signs of impulsive behavior, such as substance abuse, eating disorders, unprotected sex, and reckless spending or driving—CHECK.

I smoke.  I drink.  At one time, I did drugs.  I’ve fathered two children that I love, but never intended to have.  Casinos are very dangerous places for me.  But I drive like an old man, very slowly, most of the time.

3.  Self-Harm and Suicidal Behavior—CHECK.

The scars are mostly faded, but the razorblades and lit cigarette were once close friends of mine.  So are booze and pills.

4.  Unstable, intense personal relationships—CHECK.

Married twice.  More girlfriends than I can count.  Every relationship ends in tears, usually mine.

5.  Black and white thinking—NO.  Well, MAYBE in the moment.

But I’m pretty realistic when it comes to how I see others.  I realize that no one is all-bad or all-good, though I do have a tendency to idealize my romantic partners.

6.  Manipulative behavior to obtain nurturance—DOUBLE CHECK.

Maybe even triple.  I’ll do anything, things I’m terribly ashamed of later, to get that feeling of being loved and cared for.

7.  Poor sense of self—CHECK, but not so much anymore.

It took me to the age of almost forty to figure out what I wanted to do with my life.  I want to write and teach, and I’m doing just that.  And it feels good.  At the same time, it is sometimes hard for me to know what I value and enjoy.

Do I really write because I like to?  Do I really teach because I love it?  Maybe.  It could be just that I’ve found that I’m good at both, and being good at both gets me attention and admiration from others.  I’m not really sure that I enjoy anything.

8.  Dissociation, feeling empty, or zoning out—CHECK.

Now, everyone zones out from time to time, but probably not to the same level that I do, and probably not for the same reasons.  Periods of high emotions can make me shut down at a cognitive level.  I become so preoccupied by the wave of emotion crashing over me that I can think of nothing else.  Sometimes, this is nice.  Like that first feeling of new love where my heart goes all aflutter.  That’s AWESOME.  But most of the time, it’s a negative emotion that has
my attention.  And that pretty much sucks.

Well, those are pretty much my life in a nutshell.  Sucks to be me sometimes, but not all of the time.  I gotta try to remember that.  Until next time.

Your bother in arms,

-Bruce

Read more from Bruce Anderson here: How I Became the Freak in the Corner

(A page that tells his story from the beginning and has links to several of his articles)

Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

Signs and Symptoms of BPD