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symptoms of depression

Aromatherapy as Treatment of Depression

We are all affected by sights, sounds, and smells.

That is why aromatherapy is effective for so many different things that we may experience in our lives. It includes physical illnesses as well as mental setbacks, such as depression. In fact, aromatherapy is highly effective in easing the symptoms of depression.

LavenderLavender is one of the most effective scents for the treatment of depression. This scent increases the instance of waves in the back of the head, which promotes relaxation. Jasmine is also another well-known scent, as it increases the example of waves in the front of the head.

However, the waves increased in the back of the head with lavender are alpha waves — for relaxation — while the waves increased in the front of the head are beta waves — for alertness.

Aside from lavender and jasmine, other scents are also useful for various aspects of depression symptoms. These include clary sage (insomnia), basil (fatigue), rose (nervous system), and sandalwood (tension). Other prominent scents that may ease symptoms of depression include chamomile, patchouli, bergamot, rosemary, and geranium.

Essential OilWhile you can use candles for aromatherapy, the ideal method is to use essential oils of the herb scent that you require. Essential oils can be used as diffusers, in baths, massages, or even as perfume or body splashes.

Again, when using scents for aromatherapy, the oils are more effective than candles. These oils can be purchased from health food stores and online sources. In many cases, you will receive a small break on the cost when ordering larger quantities.

While aromatherapy will ease symptoms of depression, it should not replace therapy that is needed to treat depression, and it may not even replace medications used for treatment of depression.

Be sure to discuss treatment options with your doctor.

When aromatherapy is used as treatment of depression, oils are more effective than candles

Teenager Depression and Moodiness

Don`t confuse moodiness with depression

These days, we recognize more and more that the pressures put on our children do indeed bring on depression. There was a time that if a teenager — or an adult for that matter — suffered from depression, it was kept silent, and only certain members of the family were aware of the problem (if they were aware at all).

Today, that is no longer the case. There has been so much research done in the area of depression that it is now an “open” topic. Thankfully, teenagers are more aware that they are not alone with their feelings or problems and that help is available.

Depressed Young Girl with HangoverTeenagers are often moody. That is a natural part of being a teenager, and it is caused by the chemical changes in the brain as they go through puberty. However, moodiness should not be confused with depression — and vice versa.

The symptoms of depression in teenagers include:

•    Irritability anger or hostility
•    Tearfulness
•    Crying
•    Withdrawal from friends, family, and usual activities
•    Sadness or hopelessness
•    Changes in sleeping patterns
•    Changes in appetite
•    Agitation
•    Restlessness
•    Lack of motivation
•    Fatigue
•    Difficulty focusing
•    Difficulty making decisions
•    Thoughts of suicide and increased thoughts of death in general

Teenager Depression SpecialistAside from these general symptoms of depression, one must be aware that teenagers express their feelings in ways that are different than most adults. For example, your child may start experiencing problems at school, run away from home, start experimenting with and abusing drugs or alcohol, develop an eating disorder, become addicted to the Internet, injure themselves on purpose, become violent, have a general reckless behavior, or attempt suicide.

Treatment for a depressed teen starts at home, where the parents need to discover whether the child is depressed or not or whether something else may be causing the problem.

It is important that your teen understands that he or she is loved and accepted and that you are there for them. An appointment with a family doctor is needed, and he or she will most likely point you to a specialist that is qualified to deal with teenagers depression.

A specialist is best-qualified to deal with teenager depression

Mental Health and Grief

Grief and Mental Health – When the Two Merge

Grief is something that we all experience at one time, or another.  The stages of grief – sometimes explained as 3, 5 or 7 different stages – are pretty well known and include shock, denial, anger, sadness, acceptance in some order.  Most people will struggle but eventually come to some resolution with no prediction as to how long that will take.

Resolution of deep sorrow can be made much more difficult when a pre-existing mental illness is imposed.  A severe loss can trigger a relapse of virtually any mental illness, even when the illness was well treated, and the patient was stable.  Patients may relapse into severe depression, bipolar episodes, panic attacks or a return of obsessive compulsive behavior.  If the patient was not well stabilized, the whole apple-cart can be upset.

Depressed and Suicidal GirlEven the most mentally healthy person can become unstable if unable to resolve the feelings caused by painGrief has been known to result in clinical depression, lasting for a long period which can lead to extreme difficulties and even death in the case of suicide.  The problem comes in a case where one becomes “stuck” at a certain point – usually during the agitation period.

There is a saying;   “depression is anger turned inward.”  The existence of anger over an extended period can cause depression.

Anger allows us to have a heightened response to a threatening situation.  Anger fuels energy, giving us a false sense of power, but over time, the brain and the body run out of that same energy.  This can result in fatigue, emotional lability, and symptoms of depression.  In some cases, depression caused by grief may be resolved with grief counseling.

In other cases, however, depression may have become severe enough that medication may be warranted.  Clinical depression is characterized by:

•    Fatigue and decreased energy
•    Cloudy thinking
•    Feelings of guilt, worthlessness or helplessness
•    Insomnia or excessive sleeping
•    Irritability
•    Loss of interest in pleasurable activities
•    Body pain or digestive problems
•    Persistent sad or empty feelings
•    Thoughts of suicide

How different is this from grief – not much.  The only difference would be in how long it lasts.  Depression carries a high risk of suicide and if symptoms last longer than what would be considered “normal” – for any reason – you should seek treatmentMental Health ChaosDepression that is severe enough to interfere with normal activities for longer than four to six weeks should be treated – even if life circumstances explained it.  Counseling may work – or you may need medication for a short period.

If you have some known mental disorder, stay in contact with your mental health professional.  Most – and I did not say “all”, but most mental health patients find it difficult to self-assess, some find it difficult to be openly honest.  The only way to ensure that an episode of grief is resolved without severe consequences of going “off track” is to allow someone else to help assess your mental state.

Whether you are or are not a mental health patient, know that grief can cause mental illness and can worsen an existing illness – even if only for a short time.  It is not something to be dismissed or ignored as the risks are high.

Melissa Lind

Depression is Anger Turned Inward

Depression – When to Seek Help

Some level of depression is perfectly normal and does not require treatment

Sad and Depressed GirlWe all feel a little down or a little “blue” from time to time. We all have life events that will make us feel very sad as well, such as the loss of a loved one, the breakup of a relationship, financial difficulties, etc.

In most cases, however, these down periods are temporary. At what point, however, should you seek help for your depression? While people feel depression in different ways, and to different extents, there are specific warning signs that one should look for when determining whether or not they actually need treatment or not.

First, if your depression has lasted for more than a period of two weeks, you most likely need to seek treatment. Make an appointment with your medical doctor for a checkup, and discuss your feelings with him. He will most likely perform a physical exam to determine if there is a physical cause for those feelings, and he will also ask about your life events and current stressors.

Other than seeking help if the sadness lasts for more than two weeks, another sign that help is needed — immediately — is if you are having suicidal thoughts, or if you have already attempted suicide.
Do not wait to seek treatment. Contact your doctor, or call a suicide hotline for immediate help!

Feeling HopelessEven if depression is temporary, all of the other symptoms of depression are normal — except for the two discussed above. You may have a change in sleeping and eating patterns, you may feel like everything is hopeless. You may have the fatigue and the aches and the pains.

But again, if those symptoms do not go away within two weeks, or you feel suicidal, treatment is needed.

In many cases, a medical doctor can treat you for the depression, depending on the cause and the severity of your mental state. The important thing is to seek the help and to be as honest with your doctor as possible — whether your doctor is a therapist or not, he (or she) must still keep all conversations with you in confidence.

When should one seek help in cases of depression?

Zoloft for a Treatment of Depression

Is it safe to use Zoloft for a treatment of depression?

Zoloft is a common antidepressant that doctors prescribe for the treatment of depression and depression symptoms. Zoloft is a very gentle antidepressant but has a powerful effect as well.

Depression and ZoloftZoloft can start working in as little as a week, although it could take up to three weeks to feel the symptoms of depression easing. Zoloft is safe to take for an extended period; however, one should never stop taking Zoloft “cold turkey.”

It isn’t addictive, in the truest sense of the word, but Zoloft is an SSRI, which means that it is forcing a change in the brain chemistry. Because of this, your doctor will most likely “wean” your body off of Zoloft slowly by reducing the dosages, and allowing your brain to do more of the work without help from the medication.

Zoloft is not just prescribed for the treatment of depression. Research has also found that it is a suitable medication for the treatment of panic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

There are side effects associated with the use of Zoloft. These include impotence and/or changes in sex drive and libido, upset stomach, drowsiness, anxiety, irritability, urination problems, appetite changes, headaches, constipation or diarrhea, blurred vision, nightmares, insomnia, hair loss, dry mouth, sweating, muscle spasms, slowed speech, irregular heartbeat, and tremors.

Symtoms of DepressionBefore taking Zoloft, your doctor needs to know if you have a history of mania, suicidal thoughts, high blood pressure, kidney disease, liver disease, heart disease, seizures, enlarged prostate, urination problems, thyroid problems, or glaucoma.

Despite the potential side effects, most people don’t have any trouble with Zoloft, and it is one of the most-prescribed drugs for the treatment of depression. It is also considered one of the safest drugs for depression treatment. If you suffer from depression, you should definitely discuss Zoloft with your physician.

Zoloft for depression treatment despite potential side effects

Seniors and Depression

Elderly people are often hiding their depression

Just as teenage depression has received more recognition and validation over the last decade, depression in senior citizens has also gained more attention. Teenagers are facing loads of issues — and seniors are as well, even though the effects are quite different.

Depression in ElderlySenior citizens have many worries. They are facing getting older and less capable of caring for themselves. They may be worried about outliving the funds they have set aside for their retirement. They may be facing significant changes, such as moving from their home to a retirement community or nursing home. They are also finding themselves surviving their friends.

One of the major concerns about depression in seniors is that the symptoms are not nearly as easy to identify as they would be in a child or a middle-aged adult. Senior citizens rarely tell people that they are depressed, and may not even recognize it as such. Even when the signs are noticed, they are often mistaken for other medical problems associated with age.

If a senior citizen stops taking part in active activities, this is a red flag. For instance, if an elderly lady has been going to get her hair done every week, for the last 30 years or so, and suddenly stops, you cannot assume that she just got old and stopped worrying about what her hair looked like. The culprit is probably depression. Think about the things that the elderly person had done before, and what they have recently stopped doing.

What you must remember is that today’s seniors may still consider depression to be a bad thing that one must hide from others. When they were children and then later, raising their families, if someone suffered from a mental condition — including depression — that person was thought to be either “crazy” or “incompetent.”

Naturally, since they were raised and lived in this mindset, they will try to hide their depressed feelings if and when they occur.

Senior seldom tells about their depression.